Cryptocurrency Taxes in the UK: What ... - Bitcoin Magazine

NiceHash - buy & sell hashing power

NiceHash offers you to buy or sell hashing power directly, no contracts, no limitations, pay-as-you-go if you're a buyer and be-paid-as-you-go if you're a seller. Why bother renting rigs, when you can rent hashing power? NiceHash brings more to renters and rig owners. Visit https://www.nicehash.com today! Simply create order and you are already mining your favorite coin or point your rig to our stratum server and you are already earning bitcoins.
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CryptoCurrencies

We're Crypto Reddit's Fiji water in a desert of censorship and agendas. Arguably Reddit's best source for uncensored cryptocurrency news, technicals, education, memes and so more!
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Tax on mining Bitcoin/Ethereum in the UK

Hi,
Does anybody know what tax should be paid on mining?
I would guess it comes under income tax but can't really find any clear guidelines about it.
submitted by silentdecay to BitcoinUK [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining and UK Tax law

I've built up a decent amount of bitcoins and have been looking to cash some of them out. Only problem is I have absolutely no idea how to go about doing this in a completely legal and non-tax-evasionary way. Anyone had any experience with this?
submitted by colonelsanders91 to BitcoinUK [link] [comments]

Happy Halloween - Updated Audit Status of Canadian Cryptocurrency Exchanges

Masks meant something different one year ago when I posted the highly popular “Happy Halloween - Audit Status of Canadian Cryptocurrency Exchanges”. Since then,
  1. We’ve had 20 more cryptocurrency exchange incidents globally.
  2. Canadian exchanges have seen massive progress - in at least a couple of exchanges.
  3. We’ve seen the collapse of Einstein which took millions of dollars more from Canadians. And we saw the OSC crackdown on the inflated trading volume on CoinSquare.

Blockchain provides the full ability for exchanges to prove asset backing, yet we continue to have to guess which platforms are backed. In an effort to help Canadians find the exchanges which are most transparent, we divide platforms into 5 categories:
If Proof of Reserve or another form of verification was standard on all exchanges, people like Gerald Cotten and Dave Smilie wouldn’t have been able to pull off massive fraud, and cases such as Einstein would have been known long before it resulted in insolvency. Supporting exchanges that don’t provide public validation or transparency is supporting fraud. Even if the platform is 100% honest, they are setting a dangerous standard that enables other fraudsters to hide in plain sight.

Dead Platforms/Incidents

FlexCoin - As “the world's first bitcoin bank” that’s “not a true bank”, FlexCoin provides “a central location for all of your bitcoins”. “Bitcoins deposited with flexcoin will be stored on [thei]r secure servers” so you can “send bitcoins to non-technical individual[s] via e-mail”. Unlike blockchain, “flexcoin to flexcoin transfers are free”.
MapleChange - “[S]wift, reliable and to-the-point!” “One of [their] primary concerns is security for [their] customers'' which is why “keys are cryptographically encrypted”. More Canadian than anyone! Excuse me while we hold the door open to our crypto! "[W]ithdraws(sic) are next to instantaneous", "rel[ying] solely on the aspect of swiftness"!
Canadian Bitcoins - Funds stored for convenience in a professional Rogers data center, which has the highest level of courtesy and customer service - always going above and beyond to provide expedient service whenever a request comes in!
CoinTradeNewNote - A “meticulously engineered Bitcoin Exchange” “focused on security and tak[ing] these risks seriously”. “[Y]ou don’t have to worry”, they have “90+% cold storage” and their “cold storage is fully insured by Xapo”. Plus, as “a registered Canadian corporation” they “leverage the good guys to fight the bad guys”.
Einstein - You can get “your money deposited and withdrawn faster than any other exchange”. As one customer said "With so many hacks and exit scams, it gives me confidence knowing Einstein is backed by hard-working people just like me." Just check the user experience on their subreddit from their "220,000+ satisfied customers".
EZ-BTC - As the world’s “most user-friendly and bespoke crypto currency management platform”, they have “strong security”. “All your coins are kept in cold storage. They’re safe.”. The presence of physical ATMs was one of the strategies to build customer confidence for their promised 9% annual return on stored funds.
QuadrigaCX - Operating since 2013, with “vast cryptocurrency reserves” right up to the end. "Bitcoins that are funded in QuadrigaCX are stored in cold storage, using some of the most secure cryptographic procedures possible." Even today some of the funds remain 100% secure in their cold storage!
If there are any others I missed, let me know!

No Verification Found

BitVo - Whether “Canada's premier cryptocurrency exchange” or merely “on a mission to become Canada’s premier cryptocurrency exchange”, we have to praise BitVo’s security for including “multiple signatures of a select group of trusted individuals” which are “not connected to the exchange platform or a network”. It is unfortunate that such common sense concepts are “proprietary” instead of the standard on all Canadian platforms. While assuring that they operate “on a full-reserve basis” and talking about “transparency”, the proof is lacking and nothing indicates it to have been verified externally or even internally. The withdrawal-based fee structure incentivizes users to keep funds “safe and secure” on the platform - which is “owned and operated by banking and security experts”. The “banking” side shows for sure in these hidden fine-print fees, which go well with transparency.
CoinField - Apparently no longer the "most secure trading platform in Canada" but now instead the “Best Bitcoin & Cryptocurrency Exchange In Canada” - based in Estonia and no longer having a Canadian office. They’re “fully regulated” in 193+ countries, except for the period between October 2019 and June 2020, when they weren’t even registered as an MSB. They offer a huge range of trading pairs except for the ones you need, with high liquidity except for the pairs that don’t have any, and you can withdraw and trade all of your funds as long as you leave a small amount behind at every stage.
CoinSmart - Not sure what "[i]ndustry leading cold storage" is, but luckily it’s “bank level”. No mention of multi-sig. They’re so "accountable to [their] clients, community and to each other" and "committed to being open and honest" that they don’t include any audit. Deposits are easy and withdrawals are fun - like a video game. Advance through each stage to prove your willpower, complete with warnings, SMS verification that doesn’t display errors (but luckily you can change the number to anything at all without further verification), and even an elaborate high-resolution selfie requirement you have to email in. If you can’t complete or don’t feel comfortable sending info via email, your money is held hostage - no big deal at all really.
Coinut - As "the most secure cryptocurrency exchange", they provide “a comprehensive cryptocurrency exchange platform for trading cryptocurrencies”. (Not to be confused with a cryptocurrency exchange platform for trading coconuts.) They’ve been “running securely for about three years” “by storing cryptocurrencies offline” in a single “offline computer”. In addition to not using multi-sig and "not us[ing] USB drives, as the online computer may be infected with virus", they also don’t appear to use audits or any form of public verification.
NDAX - “Canada’s most secure trading platform” to "set the standard for the Canadian cryptocurrency industry". While NDax promotes “segregated accounts” and “95-98% of user funds in an offline, multi-signature wallet”, there’s nothing to indicate backing of assets on the platform. While apparently partnered with a Canadian bank, the bank is not revealed. No audit found but at least there’s a full-page risk disclosure and disclaimer. You can sleep peacefully knowing that they’re legally protected, even “for losses suffer(sic) to you as a result of any defaults of by(sic) insolvency of other Users.” What does that even mean? Apparently, even with their industry-record withdrawal fees, they couldn’t afford a legal team with proper grammar.
Newton - Newton was one of the first to announce third party custody. You should give your funds to Newton, because they’ll give them to Balance, and they’ll do this for free! And “[m]ultinational companies trust” Balance. According to the Balance terms, “the digital assets you purchase via the Platform are not protected by any government or other insurance”. "Prospective clients...will hold the entire liability associated with purchasing a Digital Asset Cache™️ and using [Balance] services, potentially including partial or total loss of capital." "Balance does not represent or guarantee that the Balance Platform will be free from loss, corruption, attack, viruses, interference, hacking, or other security intrusion, and Balance disclaims any liability relating thereto." "No data transmission over the Internet can be guaranteed to be 100% secure, and as a result [they] cannot ensure or warrant the security of any information you transmit to [them]." "You are solely responsible for maintaining the confidentiality and security of your Account." If someone else should “[w]ithdraw the digital assets in your DAC to [thei]r external digital wallets as soon as within the same business day.” "Balance shall not be responsible for any losses arising out of the unauthorized or other improper use of your Account." The security of Balance custodianship comes down to (a) proprietary “HSMs” tested by their team of experts are more secure than hardware wallets tested by thousands of teams of experts around the globe, (b) a standardized and documented system of physical security in facilities accessible to a select number of people is superior to a combination of unique physical security, exclusive signing procedure, and complete locational secrecy that could be employed separately by multiple reasonably competent individuals, and (c) placing your trust in the team of Newton, the team of Balance, and the security of a website is more secure than simply trusting a single team to manage the private keys in an offline multi-sig fashion.
While Balance has an extensive page on security and internal controls, I was unable to locate any audit nor verification that the assets on Newton or custodian Balance are actually fully backed against deposits. From the demo page, we can see that Newton has visibility to see their balances on Balance, so at least Dustin and the team can check diligently and make sure they aren’t taken. Why not give some of that visibility to your customers? Why has Newton, which has been a leader in so many other areas (“commission-free”, working to get the best rates, etc…) not been a leader in putting together any level of public visibility to the backing of customer funds on their platform?

Apparent Verification

CoinBerry - CoinBerry uses the best practice of offline multi-sig for the storage of all customer funds, a set-up that, to date, has a breach-less record historically. Assuming the private keys are properly managed by separate trained people, CoinBerry client funds are thus stored in what’s essentially a giant cold storage wallet, with all withdrawals handled and verified by multiple people before being approved. However, this model is still subject to the platform being tricked into releasing funds as may have happened in August 2020. What they haven't done is transparently admitted and explained how the breach occurred, which can be an opportunity to highlight security improvements and help other platforms avoid similar issues. Instead, they've recently purchased insurance to cover future incidents. It's hard to judge from a few excerpts of what’s likely a multi-page (or even a multi-chapter) policy, but it would be the first time that insurance has ever paid out in the history of cryptocurrency. A multi-platform insurance strategy could be cheaper, more comprehensive, and more likely to pay out than third party insurance.
CoinBerry is “trusted by Canadian Municipalities”, a deal that enabled “the first payment of property taxes with Bitcoin in Canadian History”. They reportedly also “undergo annual 3rd party financial statement audits”. From records, these appear to be conducted by the firm MNP which is an accounting firm. CoinBerry has not, however, publicly declared themselves to be “fully-backed”, nor have they published any verification on the backing level of funds on the platform. Rather the audits are “secret”. This is concerning given the large referral bonuses paid out by the platform to new customers (including a popular $25 referral bonus for purchasing $50 of bitcoin), multiple issues with withdrawal delays, including one affecting hundreds of customers earlier this year, and the slow increase to their “fair pricing and industry-leading low fees.” Fees have gone from 0.5% to 1%, to a tiny sentence about “adding a margin, or spread, of between 0% and 2% to the rate offered by [thei]r liquidity sources”. Luckily, they “don’t hide fees across your trading experience.” In case you should sign up and find that (up to 2%) rate to be too high, “[a]ccounts requesting a withdrawal of Fiat or Crypto currency in original form, without conducting a trade will be...charged an account maintenance fee calculated as the larger of $25 or 5% of the total amount requested.” You will also need to pay additional “mining fees for crypto withdrawals”, which significantly exceed typical transaction costs and are only mentioned in the fine print of their fees page. CoinBerry has publicly expressed agreement that you should not store funds on cryptocurrency exchanges including their own. Neither their insurance nor world-class security will do anything whatsoever if their platform goes insolvent.
CoinSquare - CoinSquare has had a rough year, most notably with being publicly declared as having inflated trading volume and having to pay multi-million dollar fines. As usual, the Reddit community was already on top of this and apparently, some staff at the company were even open about it. Ironically, one could argue that their dishonest practice did more to stand up to Quadriga than regulators ever did, may have saved thousands of Canadians from losing their funds, and may even have been a key factor in bringing Quadriga down. It remains to be seen what will become of the shell of one of Canada's oldest exchanges. It would be the ultimate in poetic irony if the actions of the OSC to protect CoinSquare investors ultimately destroyed the full value of their investment. If that plays out, I'm sure they will heap praise on the OSC for so publicly and fragrantly shaming CoinSquare for a practice which was similarly employed on other exchanges globally and which they'd already voluntarily ceased months prior to the conclusion of the 6-figure investigation and 7-figure fines.
That said, CoinSquare already had a lack of visibility into their security practices, which they describe as “100% proprietary”. This would imply the team at CoinSquare is smarter than established security standards by experts all around the world at protecting your funds, contradicting previously reported incidents. They describe “SSL and 2FA”, which are more or less standard features of all exchanges. A “95% cold storage” policy is low compared to many other platforms, and it doesn’t appear to be mentioned whether multi-sig is being employed or not. And of course, their apparent regular audits are not public (allegedly by “a national accounting firm whose identity is protected under an NDA"). They’ve routinely described themselves as solvent rather than fully backed.
Kraken - A kraken is “an enormous mythical sea monster”, and likewise Kraken, the exchange, is enormous, the largest and oldest exchange platform in North America. Kraken recently achieved the momentous accomplishment of becoming the first cryptocurrency exchange to be a regulated bank by completing a charter in the state of Wyoming. Kraken calls itself the “most trusted cryptocurrency exchange” and apparently “provides world class financial stability by maintaining full reserves, healthy banking relationships and the highest standards of legal compliance”. While many individual Kraken customers have been hacked, the platform overall never has, which is an impressive record.
Similarities abound further. According to legend, kraken exist off the coast of Norway. According to alleged court papers, Kraken operated illegally in the state of New York. Should you encounter a kraken, you may be best to leave silently. If you should work at the counter for Kraken, you may be legally silenced. One of the former employees for Kraken alleges wrongful dismissal and that the bank accounts of Kraken are actually running millions of dollars short of where they should have been. But don't worry - Kraken’s website features a Proof of Reserve page, stating that “[o]ver the past several weeks, Kraken has successfully developed and completed an industry-leading, independent, cryptographically-verified audit.” But the page was written in 2014 and among the long list of limitations, the process does not enable any validation on the blockchain. Kraken hasn't done any validation or publishing of reserves in 6 years and counting.
NetCoins - Once upon a time, the cofounder of CoinTrader (sound familiar?) decided to found a new exchange - “Canada’s easiest, most trusted way to buy and sell crypto”. As they say on the FAQ, “[t]rading cryptocurrency is completely safe”. Having your own wallet is “entirely up to you! You can certainly keep cryptocurrency, or fiat, or both, on the app.” “Get verified in minutes!” While comforting to know that parent corporation BIGG Digital Assets is audited by Manning Elliott LLP and they have “[r]eal human beings you can get in touch with easily”, this doesn't make up for no visibility whatsoever into how funds are stored or what portions are backed.

Full Backing Report

There are only two exchanges in Canada meeting these criteria.
BitBuy - BitBuy has operated since 2016, and was the very first to get a “Proof of Reserve and Security Audit Report” from third party CipherBlade. Since that time, they’ve also established themselves as the first company to get two separate third party validations, with the second one from Blockchain Intelligence Group. The platform’s initial operation as a non-custodial “Express Trade” model lends additional credibility. Therefore, with now two independent third party reports, BitBuy maintains the title as the most transparent exchange in Canada.
However, “Bitbuy has moved its existing bitcoin holdings over to Knox”. You now have to trust both teams and platforms for the security of your funds. This is described by them as an “industry leading push for best practices”. Insurance is of course “subject to the full policy terms, conditions and exclusions”. And “Bitbuy will be Knox’s first platform partner”. Knox has never done this before for any other platform. Their security model is “a mouthful for most”, but let’s break down their pitch. They have “air-gapped specialized hardware”. So is a standard typical hardware wallet. It’s running “custom policy logic”, which could be a good or a bad thing depending on the logic. Their logic has probably been vetted by a single team of experts, which is a standard shy of most hardware wallet protocols vetted by thousands of experts globally. They use a “dual-control operational model”, which if you look up dual-control, it actually refers to the fact that the functionality of the module is simultaneously performing actions and being monitored”. It allows one to “experiment with the system so as to learn about its behavior and control it better in the future” which you can decide for yourself if that’s a good thing to have or not in the hardware that controls withdrawals of an active exchange platform. There is “offline transaction processing”, which again is a standard feature of a hardware wallet. “Geographically distinct facilities” is a good idea, though easily achieved by not storing all the private keys in the same place. Saying that the facilities “communicate in a closed network” is an interesting concept. How can you know that a network is closed? If the facilities are close together, they can be breached together. If far apart, someone can get in the middle. The network is no longer closed the moment any part of it is breached. I can go on and on and break down every one of their systems if I have to, but instead, I’ll quote their own security advice about “minimizing the attack surface of the entire key lifecycle”. The minimum attack surface for a private key is having an individual generate it secretly and securely using a process which is vetted by hundreds of security experts around the world, and not relying on a third party to have to control anything to do with that key. This is already available from most standard hardware wallets, with experts debating whether other advanced experts can find a way to extract the key with access to extremely sophisticated equipment and physical access to the hardware. The best and most efficient way to mitigate a weak or corruptible party is through multi-sig where all parties have to sign the transaction. Adding intermediary custodians instead means funds are lost when any one of them is breached, and when using the same in-house hardware as Knox does, any vulnerability on that hardware or supply chain can compromise multiple wallets at once.
Now, insurance. The policy isn’t public on its website. It gives high-level features only. What’s astounding is that “collusion” is considered a break-through, which says a lot about the state of third party insurance in the space. I requested an example policy from their team. Their response was that it was “proprietary” and that they only “go over it with serious buyers”. In other words, no one has visibility to the actual policy details of what’s really covered outside of BitBuy or Knox, and neither party has any incentive to present that information objectively. For now, until someone cares to prove me wrong, I’ll quote their own website, “[m]ost policies covering Bitcoin theft and loss fall short and provide a false sense of security”.
One of the issues with the BitBuy validation is that it offers no visibility whatsoever for customers to know if their balances were included in any of their third-party validations. As such, BitBuy could have excluded any number of customers and passed both verifications with flying colours. That's why it isn’t a full Proof of Reserve. Also, they stopped talking to me again. But I still believe that BitBuy is one of the least worst platforms, now with reserves verified by two separate third parties.
ShakePay - Firstly, congratulations. The formerly trustless raccoon has now got a third party validation - a key step forward. The ShakePay platform is incredibly good at marketing, with the most powerful “Shaking Sats” program to literally get thousands of Canadians to think about buying more cryptocurrency every single day, or at least to pay homage to their great raccoon mascot. More recently, ShakePay completed a security assessment provided by CipherTrace, and added further insurance. CipherTrace found that reserves appeared to be fully backed including extensive analysis of the transactions and provided data.
ShakePay could be upfront that they charge a market spread or list the buy and sell prices. Instead, they promote the service as “no fees” and list only one price for bitcoin or ethereum, the only coins they sell. To find the model you have to click through to a separate page. The spread and pricing information is only ever available from within a registered account. ShakePay does not offer any additional trading functionality or coins.
ShakePay states that the “majority of all digital currencies are stored securely offline”. The CipherBlade report found this ratio was at “93% of Bitcoin and 91% of Ethereum” in cold storage at the time of the report, though it “var[ies] periodically to some degree throughout the day”. The report refers to a “multi-signature wallet interface”, which they later call a “service to access its sending and receiving multi-signature wallets”, which apparently also “does not have control over cryptocurrency in the hot wallets”. This part doesn’t exactly make sense, as one would most likely consider “access” to a “sending” function as “control”. Apparently, this “not mentioned” service is “without any known security risks” and there are also “redundancy measures” in place as well. Whatever that means in the context of irreversible transactions is a mystery.
However, the majority of funds are no longer stored with ShakePay but have now been given to an undisclosed “trust company registered under the NYDFS”. The “variety of security protocols” in place here include “address whitelisting”, the only policy they are willing to disclose publicly “for security reasons”. While ShakePay won’t identify the third party, “CipherBlade can confidently conclude that Shakepay controls these cold wallets” even though “they are controlled by [the] cold storage provider” and “the cold storage provider ultimately holds the private keys”. ShakePay does receive “an account statement” “which includes applicable wallet addresses and balances held” and “[d]ata found on the blockchain was also in line with information found on these statements.” It will be interesting to see in one of many “quite unlikely” events what “the cold storage provider’s policy and Shakepay’s own policy” would cover, given that the details of both policies are completely secret. Luckily, “[t]he vast majority of Shakepay customers who purchase cryptocurrency on the Shakepay platform withdraw it promptly thereafter.”
It’s important to note that this report is not a Proof nor an Audit (as originally named). “The reviewer is not a professional accountant, and CipherBlade has not performed a professional financial audit or an audit of internal controls and expresses no assurance on the accounting records of Shakepay.” ShakePay was happy to remove “audit” but they still continue to insist on calling this a “proof”, when it’s not. They claim “Proof of Reserves can have a variety of setups” and they cited Nic Carter’s blog post, which also listed all the criteria for the proof, which they did not meet. In discussion with Nic (who is amazingly open to chat), he’s agreed “what they are doing is not a full PoR” and he “didn’t believe it would be a widely consulted thing - [he] was mostly doing it to encourage custodians to take PoR seriously”. The point of a “proof” and why it’s called a “proof” is because it leaves no doubt. A Proof of Reserve needs to prove the reserves - that funds exist on the blockchain, are spendable by the platform, and fully back the assets of any customer who bothers to check. ShakePay’s does not.

Proof of Reserves

Presently all platforms in Canada have refused to provide visibility to the public blockchain entries backing funds on their platform. They have refused to sign a proof of spendability for any funds they control. All claims and verifications have been against customer lists provided by the platform with no ability for any customers to validate they were included. This is a recipe for more Gerald Cottens and Dave Smillies.
I understand Proof of Reserve is not practical for all platforms. I was able to come up with an alternative that doesn’t require public blockchain visibility, could be implemented today using reputable third parties, and effectively validates all customers are included.

How We Could Have Safe Exchange Platforms In Canada

The first and largest issue has always been a lack of transparency. Far more funds have been lost to fraudulent platforms and wallet services than hacks. Honest platforms need to be giving greater visibility and certainty to their customers to make fraud obvious.
Secondly, no platform employing offline storage and multi-sig has ever been breached. We need to agree on the basic standards of what it takes to keep assets secure and create an environment where best practices are shared instead of hidden between platforms.
And thirdly, third party insurance incentivizes high fees, it limits coverage, and it does everything possible to avoid a payout. We need an organized insurance strategy that is run by platform operators and overseen with the full protection of Canadians in mind.


What’s possible is exciting, but not guaranteed. There are a lot of irreversibly horrible futures which are even more likely if we merely sit back and watch.
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

I know nothing about Danish banking and finances and i'm Danish!

So, long story short I left Denmark as a very little kid and have never been back expect for a weekend trip to Copenhagen a few years back. I've lived most of my life and adult life in the UK (I'm 27), i'm basically British culturally but Danish by birth and nationality. I lost contact with my family so i have absolutely no ties to Denmark whatsoever.
My goal is to reintegrate into Denmark and hopefully buy a small cabin somewhere, I have a job in London that allows me to work remotely/WFH full time. I've been thinking about/when I settle down I would rather have my kids be in Denmark than grow up in London, aslo buying a house in London post-brexit seems like a terrible idea (but I do have settled status in UK, not a dual-national).
I have lots of savings in UK saving accounts, I also hold a small number of stocks and shares £500 mark, and a similar amount in bitcoins/cryptocurrency.
I was really happy to find this subreddit, I'm basically after the basics, I don't know any Danish people or speak Danish which has been the biggest barrier to all of this. I'm very financial aware and competent in the UK and would like to know more about the Danish system to get the confidence I need to make the move when the time comes.

  1. I have recently learnt about the CPR number and I have found mine, and I will apply for a NemID once i move to my new place in London - How does the NemID tie into everything?
  2. How do I open a Danish bank account with no address in DK?
    1. If this is possible, which bank is the best for "internationals"? (I have noticed the absence of Monzo/Starling,N26 style banks in Denmark)
  3. What should I do about my savings in British accounts if i decided to move them to a Danish bank account? Will it be taxed again?
  4. I have been aware of the challenges of buying a home in Denmark but are their government schemes like "Help to Buy" or saving accounts like the "Lifetime ISA Account" in UK that are designed for people saving up to buy a home?
    1. In layman's terms, what is the process for buying a home in DK?
  5. If, let say, I decided to move to Denmark, and work remotely from Denmark, would i also owe taxes in Denmark from my salary paid into my British bank account?
Thanks in advance.
submitted by Therioum to dkfinance [link] [comments]

Round up of Cryptocurrency News #10 Week 28/09 - 4/10

Hello and sorry all its been about a month since serious post. So what has happened this week? 1. Kucoin exchange was hacked for over $150 Million in Bitcoin. Bitfinex and Tether freezes $33 Million of stolen funds. Over this past week we have seen many cryptocurrencies on the exchange be released from the freeze. However, users are still waiting on the main cryptos to be released as KuCoin is working on their security of their platform to make sure it does not happen again. The hacker itself tried to dump his tokens over Binance... Good try lol https://news.bitcoin.com/kucoin-hack-17m-laundered-via-decentralized-exchanges-blockchain-analysis-firm-claims-this-can-still-be-traced/ (HOLY MOLY) https://news.bitcoin.com/kucoin-ceo-says-exchange-hack-suspects-found-204-million-recovered/ 2. Bitcoin outperforms Gold, Nasdaq, 10 year treasury and S&P 500. not surprising at all for us but still very interesting, Bitcoin is up 48% since the start of the year. It appears more people are becoming interested in cryptocurrency as Bitcoin continues to be the best performing asset not just in the past 10 years but of all time. On a more personal note, I was at a small gathering today (within covid restrictions) and I was just saying how i was really interested in cryptocurrency. For the first time ever everyone around me was really interested in what it was and how it worked also talked to a lot of my stock market friends and almost all have pulled out or thinking of pulling out. related: https://dailyhodl.com/2020/10/01/report-details-unprecedented-levels-of-wall-street-interest-in-bitcoin-and-cryptocurrency/ https://dailyhodl.com/2020/10/02/former-goldman-institutional-trader-says-large-investors-now-buying-bitcoin-and-gold-at-same-pace-heres-why/ 3. CBDC news - US federal reserve is actively working on the a digital dollar. From a previous post we know that the European Union is working on a Digital Euro and China is working on their own digital dollar. For me this is a bit of a worrying issue and seems like an upgrade for their own outdated systems completely removing the idea of decentralisation. In addition to this, I find it interesting that in Australia all cryptocurrency tax laws were written in late 2017/2018 and continues to be adapted. In Russia their are harsh penalties for unreported cryptocurrency holdings. In my controversial view I think the technology of blockchain can actually be used to recreate and rewrite a much better future through its innate abilities. we can avoid things like this: https://news.bitcoin.com/jpmorgan-fraud-billion-dollar-settlement/ 4. Highlights on cryptojacking - if you dont know what this is it is when a script or code runs on a computer to mine cryptocurrency using your computer resources. You can block these using other programs or scripts and being safe over the internet. 5. World economic forum names XRP as crypto asset most relevant in central bank digital currency space. Many partnerships in the space plus flare coming later. https://dailyhodl.com/2020/09/30/ripple-matchmaking-effort-discovered-featuring-170-financial-institutions-is-xrp-front-and-cente i definitely have a love hate relationship with XRP. 6. https://dailyhodl.com/2020/09/28/defi-movement-shatters-11000000000-in-total-crypto-assets-locked/ https://news.bitcoin.com/uniswap-captures-2-billion-locked-dex-volume-outpaces-second-largest-centralized-exchange/ 7. https://www.ey.com/en_au/blockchain/blockchain-platforms 8. https://dailyhodl.com/2020/09/29/twitter-ceo-jack-dorsey-says-bitcoin-and-blockchain-will-fuel-financial-freedom-and-transform-future-of-content-delivery/ 9. https://news.bitcoin.com/easily-spend-your-bitcoin-via-prepaid-debit-card-or-a-paypal-account-with-bitcoin-of-americas-easy-to-use-trading-platform/ 10. https://news.bitcoin.com/bitcoin-com-exchange-to-list-aspire-and-aspire-gas-as-newest-digital-asset-creation-platform-comes-to-market/ 11. https://news.bitcoin.com/onecoin-victims-petition-establishment-european-crypto-fraud-compensation-fund/ 12. https://news.bitcoin.com/atari-announces-ieo-collaboration-and-listing-of-the-atari-token-with-bitcoin-com-exchange/ Atari also partners with Cryptocurrency project ULTRA. Don't sleep on NFT projects, they may be a niche but they help with organisation, collectability and simplifies processes. 13. https://news.bitcoin.com/aurus-disrupts-the-gold-industry-today-its-ecosystem-lists-at-a-value-of-75m/ 14. https://dailyhodl.com/2020/10/01/irs-deploying-two-firms-to-track-crypto-transactions-in-million-dollar-deal/ 15. https://dailyhodl.com/2020/10/01/number-of-crypto-users-shatters-100000000-worldwide-cambridge-study/ https://news.bitcoin.com/bitcoin-posts-a-66-day-consecutive-streak-above-the-10k-price-range/ 16. https://news.bitcoin.com/cryptocurrency-exchange-diginex-trading-nasdaq/ 17. https://news.bitcoin.com/smart-contract-protocol-rsk-attempts-to-bring-defi-to-the-bitcoin-network/ 18. Bitmex news: https://news.bitcoin.com/bitmex-criminal-charges-prison/ well this happened. https://news.bitcoin.com/open-interest-on-bitmex-drops-16-investors-withdraw-37000-btc-in-less-than-24-hours/ https://dailyhodl.com/2020/10/02/bitmex-fires-back-after-us-accuses-crypto-exchange-of-failing-to-prevent-money-fraud/ https://dailyhodl.com/2020/10/03/440000000-in-bitcoin-exits-bitmex-as-crypto-traders-respond-to-cftc-allegations/ 19. Contract to break monero privacy: https://news.bitcoin.com/chainalysis-and-integra-win-1-25-million-irs-contract-to-break-monero/ 20. https://news.bitcoin.com/stacking-satoshis-leveraging-defi-applications-to-earn-more-bitcoin/ 21. https://dailyhodl.com/2020/10/02/bitcoin-whale-issues-big-warning-to-traders-heres-why-he-believes-group-of-crypto-assets-are-at-risk-from-regulators/ 22. https://news.bitcoin.com/venezuelas-state-run-defi-crypto-exchange-goes-live-after-maduros-anti-blockade-speech/ 23. https://news.bitcoin.com/crypto-exchange-coinbase-hands-over-customer-data-to-uk-tax-authority/ 24. https://news.bitcoin.com/jeff-booth-bitcoin-price-of-tomorrow/
25. https://news.bitcoin.com/eth-volumes-top-125-billion-in-q3-high-risk-dapps-dominate-tron-network/ 
Here is a small cross post for price movement: https://dailyhodl.com/2020/09/30/bitcoin-btc-tezos-xtz-cardano-ada-etoro-crypto-roundup/
Seems like everyone is bullish on bitcoin and leading crypto projects to make big gains over the next year, sooner rather than later. Bitcoin also holds above $10.5K with over 1Million wallets. Bitcoin interest is gaining throughout the world as many parts are hit by economic crisis.
Ethereum 2.0 roadmap updated, plans to exponentially increase scalability! VERY BULLISH. https://dailyhodl.com/2020/10/03/vitalik-buterin-updates-ethereum-2-0-roadmap-details-plans-to-exponentially-increase-scalability/
submitted by IOTAbesomewhere to Gravychain [link] [comments]

March beermoney earnings report (£319.16) - Who paid me in March

I figured I'd post my first beermoney earnings report and no this is not an april fools, I hope u/flybywire2a doesn't mind me borring his formatting as i'm bad at starting from scratch.
Anyway here's what I made :
Source Type March
Upvoice Passive - Browser Extension $30
IntelliZoom Panel User Testing $8
BigToken Surveys $100
CitizenMe Surveys £6.60
Viewsbank Surveys £16
McMoney Passive - SMS $5
LazyBucks Passive - Facebook $15
Bitwala Sign-up €30
Zuex Sign-up Interest £0.12
Xapo Sign-up £15.16
Trading212 Sign-up £29.22
MoneySMS Passive - SMS €5.10
Huyu Receipt Scanning £5
ReceiptHog Receipt Scanning £3
Panel App Passive - Location £1
OnePulse Surveys $10
TopCashBack Cashback £82.31
Google Opinion Rewards Surveys £1.32
Streetbees Surveys £3
Electroneum Passive - Cloud Mining £1.76
Phoneum Passive - Cloud Mining $1
Brave Passive - Browser £11.17
Chip Sign-up £10
Tickr Sign-up £10
OnlyFans Adult Entertainment $20
Converted Total £319.16
Seems pretty good for a third month considering i'm doing everything haphazardly, sadly I didn't record the prior months but started doing it now in case I need to ever pay tax on my earnings.

Sign-Ups

Please be aware all sign-ups require you to use a ref link or code in order to get the bonus.

Surveys

User Testing

Cashback

Receipt Scanning

Passive

Adult Entertainment - Definitely not for everyone

submitted by beegweena to beermoneyuk [link] [comments]

Koinly Launches Cryptocurrency Tax Calculator for UK Traders

With clear tax guidelines and cryptocurrency regulations, UK's tax authority, the HMRC, has made it abundantly clear that Bitcoin is not exempt from taxes - as many may believe.
Koinly is a fast growing crypto tax startup that promises to help bitcoin investors prepare their crypto tax reports in a fast and efficient manner. By linking exchange accounts and public wallet addresses with Koinly, investors can get a detailed capital gains report within a matter of minutes.
"UK's capital gains system is one of the most complex and with the thousands of transactions that crypto investors can quickly rake up - there is simply no way to manually do all the calculations. Our aim with Koinly is to make it easy for both crypto traders and accountants to generate their capital gains tax forms," said Robin Singh, founder of Koinly.
Taxes are an integral part of any financial system and it is a good sign that tax authorities are coming out with clear guidance around cryptocurrencies instead of blanket banning them. However, added tax liabilities may become a deterrent to the mainstream adoption of Bitcoin so tax solutions such as Koinly are likely to play a crucial role in overcoming this.
The platform currently supports some 400 crypto exchanges and wallets as well as 6000 cryptocurrencies. It also comes with tax-planning features that can help investors preview and plan their trades in a tax-efficient manner. Some other features:
- Income reports for Mining, Staking and DeFi interest. - Capital gains summary form that can be submitted to the HMRC - Full support for crypto taxes in UK including Share Pooling
submitted by robinyoz to BitcoinUK [link] [comments]

Lessons learned - Crypto and Divorce - In January I was a millionaire thanks to BTC, then my wife divorces me and now I have $30,000 AMA

Crossreferencing u/nanoissuperior He wrote earlier today: https://www.reddit.com/CryptoCurrency/comments/a3n6uw/in_january_i_was_a_millionaire_thanks_to_nano_now/
Title: In January I was a millionaire thanks to Nano, now I have $25,000 AMA

I was replying to his post, but my reply ended up being a bit too large as a reply and steered off-topic, albeit an interesting one. So I decided to make it its own post, because there may be a good lessons to be learned and hoping some will come forward with good information to be shared.
I hope it can help anyone on this sub avoid the costly mistakes that I made. Here it goes: FLAIR: LEGAL (not in the list)
----
u/nanoissuperior are you who I think you are? I won't give out any further identifying clues, but I happen to know someone in the exact same position that could have written that exact same headline. If you read the first paragraph, you'll know if you know me.
The person I know bought Nano really early, based on a tip from a friend. I got in much later. By the time he told me it had already spiked to the $5 range, when I ended up buying. I then sold in the $20's so it was a good buy nonetheless. We were former colleagues at a large, large software company somewhere in the PNW, I left the company to venture out on my own and try to launch some projects I had in mind and relocated overseas for a few years. We lost contact with each other during my time away, but we connected again during the market runup and started exchanging coin information on a daily basis during the big bull run of late 2017. That was a crazy time.... the market trend was a few degrees short of vertical for pretty much all coins!

Hey, guess what? Now that I think about it, I could have written that same headline myself! In January 2018 I was a Millionaire too! Not with Nano, but thanks to purchasing a good chunk of Bitcoin in 2011 at $1.20 each. I ended up a single digit millionaire with what I had left in Bitcoin around January of 2018.
And, just like you, today, from all that wealth, I have about $30.000 left, with little to show for. Can we call that even? Although my disaster was not caused entirely by market fluctuation; Mine is a more complex story and I am going to mention it, because hopefully, it could serve as a lesson to be learned for any crypto holder out there, so they don't make the make mistake I made: Don't trust anyone. Always be skeptical and watch out for your own interests. Anyhow, here it goes:
After 5 years overseas, I had enough and wanted to come back to the States. My wife stated her preference to stay abroad, but eventually, she conceded albeit reluctantly. We chose a small town in CO to settle, and landed in November of 2017. We had plans to settle down and considered purchasing a home with my/our new fortune, based on the market price during that period. At the same time, I was also hesitant about the inherent tax payments due caused by such large liquidation. I was trying to have to pay taxes as far away as possible. So, I decided to wait till New Year's Eve and started liquidating my crypto on January 1st, 2018 right after midnight. This way, I would have 16 months (till April, 2019) to pay any capital gains taxes, and I was confident at the time that the market would give me that for free, especially at the pace that it was going. I have been an early adopter and have since then acquired the high levels of verification and trading limits per week, with many exchanges, but for a large sum like this, I needed several separate transactions, over the course of several weeks, especially wanting to do it with a US-based exchange that was linked to a US bank accounts, to avoid overseas wire transfers, meaning more fees. (Yes, I did look at all OTC options, but for reasons not relevant to the story, I couldn't make it happen, so I had to use the traditional Exchange channels for asset liquidation).
My wife and I, initially had some fundamental disagreements on the gross amount to be spent and the type of property we should be purchasing. I wanted a smaller place, with a denser, younger community, where there'd be kids our son's age for him to play. She insisted that we should go big; we had been traveling for so many years, and we had not been able to call any of our past residences our home. It was time to settle and nest; She convinced me that we should own a property of our own that we would be proud of living in for years. One that we could own outright and would not easily outgrow. We ended up splurging and purchased in cash two luxury cars for ourselves and set our sights on a large dream house in the city's Golf & Country Club, free and clear, for us and our two kids. I don't even play golf, nor do I even like it, but, if it makes her happy and it is within the safe margins of making it happen, I figured, why not? My concerns were largely financial and the numbers were adding up. It was a bit tight against my personal safe margins, but, at the same time, I was imagining to never have to make, or even have to think about, a car or home mortgage payment ever again! Bitcoin is on a roll and there is no sign of it stopping. Fine. Let's do it, before I change my mind.
Now, I admit I was extremely lucky with choosing the time of when to sell the assets. I had no clue the market would take a dive in February, and so it seemed to many that I had timed the market perfectly, selling most of my coins in the first two weeks of January of 2018. Many called me a genius for selling at the very top, as if I had some sort of wisdom to know when it would drop; the truth is much less flattering; it was nothing but dumb luck, based on me wanting to pay taxes in 2018 and defer to 2019. Awesome, well done! Yeah? well, slow down, son, not so fast.
So, I gather the 7-digit lumpsum in January 2018 and we write a check for the full amount at closing in February on the property of her dreams. A property that could easily be showcased on a luxury Real Estate magazine cover. Also, remember we had just moved back to the United States with just a few suitcases each from overseas. We had no furniture, kitchenware, curtains, TV's, bed sheets, winter clothing and so many other essential things that one usually purchases over time, but which we now had to purchase all at once. Not a problem, Bitcoin had dropped slightly but still well above $15k, I believe, at the time. And, earlier, in January, I had diligently taken this expense into account and effortlessly set aside a small fortune for equipping such a large house with everything we would ever need, brand new. It seemed we were protagonists of one of the Home Makeover Shows.
Finally, after working day and night, prepping the house non-stop for days and when every piece of furniture had finally arrived, been unpacked and carried to its corresponding room, it seemed most of the essentials were in place and the hard work was done. I longed for pouring myself a Scotch and to finally sit down and enjoy the fruits of my labor. I head downstairs to the dedicated walk-in, cigar-humidor / wine / Scotch cellar in the basement and grab the better bottle of Whisky of the few bottles of Scotch that I had bought earlier in the week. On my way up, I remember feeling a sense of calm, combined with a glow of excitement and this undescribable profound inner peace, all at once. This was such a rare, natural, non-drug induced high that I had never experienced. It felt so good! This sense of accomplishment of achieving that one thing I had been chasing and longing for my entire life. I had expected I would be chasing this goal for the next 15-20 years, and yet, here it was. No, where I was, was even better than expected! A place where not even my parents, who still have to make their monthly mortgage payments. I had done it! With a smile from ear to ear, I take a deep breath of relief and while looking around the property, I think to myself: "It's perfect, everything is in place and I can finally call this our home. We are so lucky and we are going to live a great life. A life that few can only dream of. So many concerns will be lifted and become redundant. Everything will be better. I'll start a fire in one of our two fireplaces and I am going to begin enjoying my semi-retired life with the first sip of my drink. That will be the official start of our new life".
I head over to the kitchen to get a glass and some ice cubes, while I struggle to find which one is the freezer among the many drawers in the kitchen. It was then when I notice a handwritten note placed front and center on the kitchen counter. It is from my wife and read: "There is no easy way to say this, so I am just going to say it..... I want to legally divorce [ ...]". It continued saying that she had taken our son, and had unequivocally decided to leave me. She had already filed the paperwork for divorce and that I should expect to be served in the morning.
My bliss had lasted less than 5 minutes and in less than two seconds, it turned dark, somber and I saw it all crumbling down in front of me. Like a long-awaited rocket launch, years in preparation, which then unexpectedly explodes on the launch pad during the countdown. My stomach, heart and everything in my body just sank and melted into one ball of poison in my core. I felt like throwing up. I was completely blindsided; she had played the game all along, not giving me the slightest hint of what was being concocted in the background. She had already engaged with her lawyers weeks beforehand. Her mother was already in town from another state to help out with I don't know what. I had been gaslighted and was threatened by her that I needed to see a psychiatrist due to a change in my temper that I had supposedly developed - my temper was awesome: with BTC at that price? Everything was perfect! But I obeyed and went anyhow (this would later fit her story that she had to leave with the child because she feared for her safety due to my supposed temper for which I was under treatment, therefore, I must have this temper problem, see?). Also, the purchase of the overpriced home also seemed clearly premeditated: Price was the main driver of the decision making; not location, demographics, taxes, etc. It was the wrong neighborhood for us (people much older than us, retired, golfers and no kids the same age as our son to play with). Our house happened to also be the most expensive in the neighborhood. I can see it all so clearly now.
See, your crypto coins on the blockchain, are not within the US court's jurisdiction (or, at least, it's quite debatable - a gray area - ask me for the seed and I can tell you that I may have the seed, or that I may not have the seed, I may have the wrong seed, I may have forgotten it, I may have lost it - you can't prove I did not forget, or lost it, etc). However, once it is in FIAT in a bank, or invested in a property, the courts can rule on the asset(s), freeze, disburse or order a sale of the property, etc. It's done all the time.
Also, the coins were technically mine, and by definition private property (not to be divided during the divorce) as they were acquired before the marriage. I could not prove its origins (I bought many of them via direct messaging members on Bitcointalk.org and mining rather than exchanges, so no records, receipts or nothing to prove otherwise: the big exchanges like BitStamp and Coinbase didn't start operations till 2013, if I m not mistaken. Instead, I would talk to one of the forum members offering coins we'd agree on a price, I'd send a check to wherever the individual seller instructed me to (Russia, Bulgaria, Japan, UK. etc) and the coins would be deposited to whatever address I provided. Yes, it was quite crude at the time.
However, once I converted my coins to cash and used that cash to buy a property for the benefit of the family, it became common property and thus she then had rights to a portion of it when divided between the two parties should a divorce occur - which ended up being almost 3/4 of all assets.
I was robbed in broad daylight. By the one person, I trusted with my life. The one you should trust with your life. Your life partner. And while I was in complete denial, trying to bargain, I waited too long to obtain good legal representation. When I finally ended up getting a lawyer, I was quite distraught and I clearly did not do the proper research and this resulted in a less than stellar performance and detrimental to me at many key steps in the process. I had to switch legal representation right before mediation and I can't blame my new lawyer either, as (s)he did not have the required time to catch up on all the details, (s)he did his/her best, but I was ultimately strongarmed into conceding my soon-to-be-ex-wife to let her return to the house, in exchange to obtain 50% of my son's custody, with serious and strict clauses I had to abide by. So, I had to move out, find a hole in the wall in a student apartment, pay my rent and pay our kids pre-school, while she lives grandiose, without monthly payments in the country club, till the house sells, which will likely be in the spring of next year. Nice!
Due to my delay, legal mishandling and somehow every other element in her favor, she inexplicably ended up with around 3/4 of the worth of all assets, free and clear, no taxes due. Mind you, she has never financially contributed, nor made a single $ during our entire marriage. She has never worked and had $0 in her pocket when we married. She didn't even have a checking account, well in her thirties. She is no dummy; she is street smart, knows how to manipulate people, get her way with flirting and charm, while I am more intellectual and book smart. and She beat me hands-down. She is walking away with a sum of, not quite 7 figures, but close.
With what I am left with from the sale of the house, I am responsible to pay for all the capital gains taxes from the liquidation to the IRS, which are due in April 2019. I don't expect there to be more left over than the estimated $30k mentioned above.
Hate the market all you want, I made peace with the market and am keeping busy at hating my ex for a while for putting me in the same situation. She tripped me 1 yard before the finish line and pushed me in the prickly bushes, to cross it by herself. Go figure. When I am done hating her, I'll get back to rebuilding my life again from scratch. I am not worried, I have done it before. Just pissed, I was so close and that I was so naive to not see it coming.
Sorry, I am not meaning to hijack the thread, just wanted you to know that others may have lost more than just "free" money; money we didn't really have to work for. We were the lucky ones. It is what I keep telling myself to stop me from jumping off a bridge.
PS - Woah: Sorry for the wall of text; I was just going to write the first paragraph and ended up venting about my current situation. I know, I should take this issue to /depressed, /exes or /whereisthenearestbridgeIcanjumpfrom.
Hopefully, this can be a lesson to those holding crypto and some can learn what NOT to do. I learned the hard way and was left with nothing. Don't be a nice guy. Don't trust anyone with your crypto. Anyhow, I am sure either our vigilant subreddit bot, or one of the mods will remove my post for not adhering to rule, and if not, I am sure that you fine people will downvote me to hell. Go ahead. Take away from me the little Karma I left too! Thanks!

I learned many lessons, but here are some key ones [IANAL - any crypto-educated AL opinion appreciated here, thanks] :
- Understand the concept of private property - property you acquire before getting married. INAL - this depends on the state legislation, but it is hard to prove with crypto, especially if you obtained your crypto through foreign exchanges, outside of legal jurisdictions, the petitioner might not understand or willing to invest in obtaining subpoenas and requests to businesses operating overseas, as this may result costly.
- Get a lawyer who understands, or is willing to understand crypto, its benefits of being somewhat unreachable and how that can work for you. Don't let them shortchange you with: "well, let's just convert the rest to cash, because that I understand" type of reasoning.
- If you do go to mediation, the above applies as well. This arbitrator or mediator needs to be one that understands the intrinsic details of crypto - for example, during the ATH, I bought 6 digits worth in $USD of Stellar. I used the very first version of the software, supporting Stellar on my hardware device, and put it all in a cold storage wallet somewhere around January. I routinely checked on my coins on the blockchain and they are there. A few months later, I try to access my account and the device returns a different public address, which contains 0 funds. I am still trying to debug this issue with the manufacturer, but the fact is that I was accused of hiding these coins or negligence and was demanded that I paid half of what was lost. or not lost, out of my pocket for money that I didn't have access either. I tried to explain it in the simplest terms, there are risks involved with using first come software. There is no 1800 number, mo tech support. no CEO, no, you can't call the BBB and complain, etc and no one seemed to be able to understand, nor willing to either. It became a huge roadblock for which I had to concede, not cash, but a concession, I was not wanting to concede. The petitioner leaned on the fact that I was either wilfully cheating or stupid enough to lose the coins and managed to create enough doubt in my character and integrity and there was nothing rational I could explain that she, or anyone else in the room would understand. Perhaps mutually contracting a seasoned crypto expert that can offer a neutral view and give his/her opinion might be worth considering. Andreas, where were you when I needed you? :)
- Other examples were some coins I had bought in 2012 and gifted to some of her family's kids. I was holding these, till they would turn 16 for them to pay themselves their college, or so I told them. These coins were demanded back by the petitioner. Ok, I suggested that I would send them, but with a CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY value with a block height of let's say,10 years from now, out of fear that she would spend the coins and the kids would never know (they are toddlers). No one understood what I was talking about, I was made out the crazy one, I gave up, sent her the coins, unlocked and, just as I expected, within 20 minutes of receiving them, she spent $1200 worth of it (for a flight, I think). If you are the only one speaking your language, no one is willing to listen or make an effort to understand you.
- It appears my coins were private property, which means, that I acquired them before the marriage and in case of divorce, if I have not moved them or used them for the common good of the marriage, then they remain mine. However, I liquidated them and cash ended up in my checking account to be used to buy groceries, cars and eventually a house, and it is then that they became common property. Only once they landed in my checking account on which she is named on. It appears that had I taken proper legal precautions with documentation, or a company/trust, where that money would have gone, instead of my checking accounts, elsewhere, I would have still been able to be the legal proprietor of the resulting cash. I can't quite remember the details, but it as something that was explained to me afterward, and I honestly think I just tuned it out, because it made me sick to know I could have held on to my wealth. Perhaps a lawyer can chime in? Again, much of the lack of information and every misstep taken was because of dealing with people that are accustomed to traditional assets and will not deviate from it. Crypto is different and is treated differently. It is so important to know the strengths and weaknesses when going into litigation about something that people don't understand.
- Some more I can think of, but this post is getting way out of hand in size. Feel free to comment/suggest your own and I'll add more to the comments.

Credits to: u/nanoissuperior Thanks for your post, it inspired me to write this one. Anyone, any karma you feels needs to go his way, for providing the source of inspiration, please give to O-OP.

TL;DR: Wife, having contributed $0 during entire marriage, waited until I cashed out all my crypto at the top of the bull market in January 2018, for a nice seven-figure amount, and then immediately divorced me for the money.

Edit: added TL;DR
submitted by mijalis to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Building a gaming PC ~£1000

**What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible, and include specific games or programs you will be using.**
I would like to play the newer games like Cyberpunk and Doom Eternal. I am also planning to buy either an Oculus Rift S or the Valve Index to play Half Life: Alyx.
**What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?**
~£1000 but im willing to go higher or lower if the upgrades make a difference
**When do you plan on building/buying the PC? Note: beyond a week or two from today means any build you receive will be out of date when you want to buy.**
Maybe in a week or two, but im not sure if i should wait for this whole pandemic to blow over. Has it affected part prices?
**What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? (ToweOS/monitokeyboard/mouse/etc\)**
I have a keyboard and mouse, as well as a monitor but its an old 60hz smart TV.
**Which country (and state/province) will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have access to a Microcenter location?**
UK
**If reusing any parts (including monitor(s)/keyboard/mouse/etc), what parts will you be reusing? Brands and models are appreciated.**
Might reuse monitor, but its 60hz.
**Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?**
I dont know the first thing about overclocking but if the PC is good then i dont see a reason why i would bother, just seems unnecessary.
**Are there any specific features or items you want/need in the build? (ex: SSD, large amount of storage or a RAID setup, CUDA or OpenCL support, etc)**
Perhaps an SSD for OS and a few important programs like CAD software, and a 1T HDD?
**Do you have any specific case preferences (Size like ITX/microATX/mid-towefull-tower, styles, colors, window or not, LED lighting, etc), or a particular color theme preference for the components?**
As long as it doesnt look like an office computer and isnt made of cardboard, i dont mind. Im not prioritising a flashy spinny light up rig, it would look out of place at worst.
**Do you need a copy of Windows included in the budget? If you do need one included, do you have a preference?**
I would need a version of Windows 10, preferably Home edition unless theres something better about the others?
**Extra info or particulars:**
Like i mentioned, is it worth upgrading my monitor? I wouldnt mind since i can just give it away to a friend.
Also, would you recommend i buy now or wait for the pandemic to die down a bit? Has it impacted prices?
I remember a while ago people were saying to not buy any GPU's because of the whole bitcoin mining business putting them all out of stock, is that still a thing? Im out of the loop.
Final thing is: Rift S or Index for your particular builds?

Thanks for the help.
submitted by MonoSolus to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - December 2019

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the 36th monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in December 2019
Adoption
Development
Security
Mining
Business
Education
Regulation & Politics
Archeology (Financial Incumbents)
Price & Trading
Fun & Other
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Brief History Of Bitcoin

Brief History Of Bitcoin
Well before Bitcoin and other cryptographic forms of money became computerized monetary standards, a thought showed up on one of the discussions. Before a coin pulled in the consideration of thousands and perhaps a great many speculators, common admirers of new items and the individuals who need to benefit from the following complimentary gift – known as "Satoshi Nakamoto" proposed one intriguing thought that was effectively actualized sooner rather than later.

In October 2008, an article was distributed by Satoshi Nakamoto: "A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System" which implies: a decentralized or fair electronic money framework.

Satoshi turned into the dad of digital money or blockchain. There were various endeavors to make comparable structures, yet it was totally concentrated — like existing financial structures.

The principal form of Bitcoin code was discharged in January 2009. The principal hinder in the Bitcoin blockchain was made, which offered ascend to the first Bitcoin mining. This exchange was between Nakamoto himself and one of the engineers named Hal Finney.

At first, Bitcoin didn't have a conversion scale and proportionality in fiat money, yet in October 2009, one US dollar was equivalent to 1.309 Bitcoin. The conversion standard was equivalent to the expense of power to make the first Bitcoin through mining.

In 2010, the first Bitcoin trade was made. It was classified "dwdollar". Florida designer Laszlo Hanetz paid 10,000 bitcoins to somebody in England, who in return purchased Laszlo pizza which cost $25. It was the most costly pizza ever. At the hour of this composition, 10,000 bitcoins is equivalent to $130,000. For instance, in mid-December 2017, 10,000 bitcoins was equivalent to practically a large portion of a million dollars.

In August 2010, programmers found a powerless spot in the Bitcoin blockchain, which permitted them to produce 184 billion Bitcoins and the cost of Bitcoin dropped at that point.

The Bitcoin trade stage called "MtGox" was made that year and Bitcoin; finished 2010 with a market capitalization of simply over $ 1 million.

In 2011, a bootleg market was made under the name "Silk Road" in view of Bitcoin. The primary thought of ​​this venture was unknown exchanges. Unexpectedly, the cost of Bitcoin transcended $ 1. Simultaneously, Bitcoin picked up popularity as an underground market cash or an approach to buy drugs on the web.

https://preview.redd.it/3qvwwgk9rsj41.jpg?width=700&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=7171343171f6e4f39e620b33e72d2f83b469f0e2
In 2012, a few organizations started to apply and acknowledge Bitcoin as a cash to pay for products and enterprises. Before the finish of 2013, the cost of one Bitcoin was somewhat more than $ 1,000.

In 2014, China, USA and UK started to make rules and limitations on the utilization and tax assessment from Bitcoin, which permitted the utilization of Bitcoin by money related organizations. Numerous organizations, including Microsoft, have started to acknowledge installments in Bitcoins.

In February of that year, the fundamental Bitcoin trade "MtGox", was along these lines hacked by DDOS assaults, losing a great many dollars and hurriedly shut. Notwithstanding this, the cost of Bitcoin, however dropped to $200, balanced out in the scope of $200 and 350.

During 2015, the cost of Bitcoin stayed stable and Bitcoin started to secure the characteristics of an authentic cash. Ross Ulbricht, the author of the Silk Road, was condemned to life detainment, motioning to the world that Bitcoin can't be utilized for criminal purposes without any potential repercussions.

Another hacking happened in 2016 on one of the cryptographic money wallet administrations, because of which around 72 million US dollars were lost.

At last, toward the finish of 2017, the cost of 1 coin went up to 20,000 US dollars, beginning in 2017 with a cost of $1,000. Directly after, because of the way that numerous nations have restricted the utilization of cryptographic forms of money, and the primary informal organizations like Facebook and others have prohibited the promoting of digital currencies for different reasons. Before the finish of 2018, the cost of Bitcoin went down to $3,000, which made mining practically unrewarding. The cost went up the following year. At the hour of this composition, the bitcoin cost is $5,300.
submitted by Bitcoinsinvestment13 to u/Bitcoinsinvestment13 [link] [comments]

Which type of curren(t) do you want to see(cy)? An analysis of the intention behind bitcoin(s). Part 3

Part 1
Part 2
So I have been subbed to /bitcoin since it had less than two thousand subs but haven't posted there in years. I think I took a break from researching bitcoin to take a foray into the world of conspiracy around 2014 and only got back in to it around the beginning of 2017 but with a bit of sense of skepticism and cynicism about everything. I think I returned to /bitcoin around that time but there had been a rift that had emerged in the community between those that said that bitcoin was censoring any discussion around big blocks but then also just censorship in general. This lead to the formation of /btc which became the main spot for big blockers to gather to talk about protocol development. Following the fork of Bitcoin Cash and SegWit (BTC) in August 2017 the camps were further divided when the fence sitters were denied their SegWit2x compromise. Many from the fence sitters then deferred back to the incumbent bitcoin as citing muh network effect, liquidity, and hashpower while some who felt betrayed by the failure of getting S2X through went to support BCH for some attempt at on chain scaling rather than through pegged side chains or Lightning Network.
Bitcoin cash initially went with a modest doubling of the blocksize to 2MB but implemented some other features like a new more rapidly adjusting difficulty algorithm to protect themselves against hashpower fluctuations from the majority chain. In about July of that year I had seen what I potentially thought was someone LARPing on /biz/ but screencapped, that segwit2x which was scheduled for november 2017 would be called off and then hashpower would switch to BCH causing congestion and chain death spiral on BTC and BCH would pump massively. I was partial to the idea as the game theory and incentives on a big block bitcoin should attract miners. About a month after SegWit2x was indeed called off while the BTC blockchain was hugely congested, BCH went through a violent pump reaching 0.5 BTC/BCH on a European exchange called Kraken while it also pumped ridiculously on American exchange coinbase. Shortly afterwards the market took a giant dump all over those people who bought the top and it has since retraced to roughly 30:1 or so now.
After that pump though BCH kind of gained some bagholders I guess who started to learn the talking points presented by personalities like Roger Ver, Jihan Wu, Peter Rizun and Amaury Sechet. Craig S Wright by this time had been outed as Satoshi but had in 2016 publicly failed to convince the public with the cryptographic proof he provided. To which he later published the article I don't have the courage to prove I am the bitcoin creator. In essence this allowed many to disregard anything he offered to the crypto community though his company nChain was very much interested in providing the technical support to scale what he saw as the true implementation of bitcoin. Following debate around a set of planned protocol upgrades between a bitcoin node implementation by his company nChain and the developers of another client Bitcoin ABC (adjustable block cap), the two parties both dug their heels in and wouldn't compromise.
As it became clear that a fork was imminent there was a lot of vitriol tossed out towards Wright, another big billionaire backer Calvin Ayre and other personalities like Roger Ver and Jihan Wu. Craig's credibility was disregarded because of his failure to provide convincing cryptographic proof but still people who wanted to pursue the protocol upgrades that nChain were planning (as it best followed their interpretation of the bitcoin white paper) pursued his variant, while others who followed the socia consensus deferred to the positions of their personalities like Wu, Ver, and Sechet but even developers from Ethereum and other protocols chimed in to convince everyone that CSW is a fraud. This was referred to as the hash war and was the first time that the bitcoin protocol had been contentiously hard forked.

Hashpower is the CPU cycles you can commit to the Proof of Work function in bitcoin and the majority will generate the longest chain as they have the most proof of work. To win the contentious hard fork legitimately and make sure your chain will always be safe going forward you need to maintain your version of the blockchain with 51% of the hashpower on the network and force the other parties to continue to spend money on building a blockchain that is never going to be inserted in to the majority chain. As well as this you need to convince exchanges that you have the majority chain and have them feel safe to accept deposits and withdrawals so that they don't lose money in the chaos. This is how it would play out if both parties acted according to the rules of bitcoin and the Nakamoto Consensus.

There was a lot of shit talking between the two parties on social media with Craig Wright making a number of claims such as "you split, we bankrupt you" "I don't care if there is no ability to move coins to an exchange for a year" and other such warnings not to engage in foul play.. To explain this aftermath is quite tedious so It might be better to defer to this video for the in depth analysis but basically Roger Ver had to rent hashpower that was supposed to be mining BTC from his mining farm bitcoin.com, Jihan Wu did the same from his Bitmain Mining Farm which was a violation of his fiduciary duty as the CEO of a company preparing for an IPO. In this video of a livestream during the hashwar where Andreas Brekken admits to basically colluding with exchange owners like Coinbase, Kraken (exchange Roger Ver invested in), Bitfinex and others to release a patched ABC client to the exchanges and introducing "checkpoints" in to the BCH blockchain (which he even says is arguably "centralisation") in order to prevent deep reorgs of the BCH blockchain.
>"We knew we were going to win in 30 mins we had the victory because of these checkpoints that we released to a cartel of friendly businesses in a patch so then we just sat around drinking beers all day".
By releasing a patched client that has code in it to prevent deep reorgs by having the client refer to a checkpoint from a block mined by someone who supported BCHABC if another group of hash power was to try to insert a new chain history, this cartel of exchanges and mining farm operators conspired in private to change the nature of the bitcoin protocol and Nakamoto Consensus. Since the fork there have been a number of other BCH clients that have come up that require funding and have their own ideas about what things to implement on the BCH chain. What began to emerge was actually not necessarily an intention of scaling bitcoin but rather to implement Schnorr signatures to obfuscate transactions and to date the ABC client still has a default blocksize of 2MB but advertised as 16MB.
What this demonstrates for BCH is that through the collusion, the cartel can immediately get a favourable outcome from the developers to keep their businesses secure and from the personalities/developers to work on obfuscating records of transactions on the chain rather than scaling their protocol. After the SegWit fork, many from the BCH camp alleged that through the funding to Blockstream from AXA and groups that tied to the Bilderbergs, Blockstream would be beholden to the legacy banking and would be a spoke and hub centralised model, so naturally many of the "down with central banks anarcho capitalist types" had gathered in the BCH community. Through these sympathies it seems that people have been susceptible to being sold things like coin mixing and obfuscation with developers offering their opinions about how money needs to be anonymous to stop the evil government and central banks despite ideas like Mises’ Regression Theorem, which claims that in order for something to be money in the most proper sense, it must be traceable to an originally non-monetary barter commodity such as gold.
What this suggests is that there is an underlying intent from the people that have mechanisms to exert their will upon the protocol of bitcoin and that if obfuscation is their first priority rather than working on creating a scalable platform, this demonstrates that they don't wish to actually be global money but more so something that makes it easier to move money that you don't want seen. Roger Ver has often expressed sentiments of injustice about the treatment of Silk Road found Ross Ulbricht and donated a large amount of money to a fund for his defence. I initially got in to bitcoin seeking out the Silk Road and though I only wanted to test it to buy small quantities of mdma, lsd, and mescaline back in 2011 there was all sorts of criminal activity on there like scam manuals, counterfeits, ID, Credit Card info, and other darknet markets like armoury were selling pretty crazy weapons. It has been alleged by Craig Wright that in his capacity as a digital forensics expert he was involved with tracing bitcoin that was used to fund the trafficking of 12-16 year olds on the silk road. There have been attempts at debunking such claims by saying that silk road was moderated for such stuff by Ulbricht and others, but one only has to take a look in to the premise of pizza gate to understand that there it may be possible to hide in plain site with certain code words for utilising the market services and escrow of websites like the silk road. The recent pedo bust from South Korea demonstrates the importance of being able to track bitcoin transactions and if the first thing BCH wanted to do after separating itself from Satoshi's Vision and running on developer and cartel agendas was to implement obfuscation methods, this type of criminal activity will only proliferate.
Questions one must ask oneself then are things like why do they want this first? Are some of these developers, personalities and cartel businesses sitting on coins that they know are tarnished from the silk road and want to implement obfuscation practices so they can actually cash in some of the value they are unable to access? Merchants from the silk road 1 are still being caught even as recently as this year when they attempted to move coins that were known to have moved through the silk road. Chain analytics are only becoming more and more powerful and the records can never be changed under the original bitcoin protocol but with developer induced protocol changes like Schnorr signatures, and coinjoin it may be possible to start laundering these coins out in to circulation. I must admit with the cynicism I had towards government and law enforcement and my enjoying controlled substances occasionally I was sympathetic to Ross and donated to his legal fund back in the day and for many years claimed that I wouldn't pay my taxes when I wanted to cash out of bitcoin. I think many people in the space possess this same kind of mentality and subsequently can be preyed upon by people who wish to do much more in the obfuscation than dodge tax and party.
Another interesting observation is that despite the fact that btc spun off as a result of censorship around big block scaling on bitcoin, that subreddit itself has engaged in plenty of censorship for basically anyone who wants to discuss the ideas presented by Dr Craig Wright on that sub. When I posted my part 2 of this series in there a week ago I was immediately met with intense negativity and ad hominems so as to discourage others from reading the submission and my post history was immediately throttled to 1 comment every 10 mins. This is not quite as bad as cryptocurrency where my post made it through the new queue to gather some upvotes and a discussion started but I was immediately banned from that sub for 7 days for reason "Content standards - you're making accusations based on no evidence just a dump of links that do nothing to justify your claims except maybe trustnodes link (which has posted fabricated information about this subreddit mods) and a Reddit post. Keep the conspiracy theories in /conspiracy" My post was also kept at zero in bitcoin and conspiracy so technically btc was the least censored besides C_S_T.
In addition to the throttling I was also flagged by the u/BsvAlertBot which says whether or not a user has a questionable amount of activity in BSV subreddits and then a break down of your percentages. This was done in response to combat the "toxic trolls" of BSV but within bitcoincashSV there are many users that have migrated from what was originally supposed to be a uncensored subreddit to discuss bitcoin and many such as u/cryptacritic17 has have switched sides after having been made to essentially DOXX themselves in btc to prove that they aren't a toxic troll for raising criticisms of the way certain things are handled within that coin and development groups. Other prominent users such as u/jim-btc have been banned for impersonating another user which was in actual fact himself and he has uploaded evidence of him being in control of said account to the blockchain. Mod Log, Mod Damage Control, Mod Narrative BTFO. Interestingly in the comments on the picture uploaded to the blockchain you can see the spin to call him an SV shill when in actual fact he is just an OG bitcoiner that wanted bitcoin to scale as per the whitepaper.
What is essentially going on in the Bitcoin space is that there is a battle of the protocols and a battle for social consensus. The incumbent BTC has majority of the attention and awareness as it is being backed by legacy banking and finance with In-Q-Tel and AXA funding blockstream as well as Epstein associates and MIT, but in the power vaccum that presented itself as to who would steward the big block variant, a posse of cryptoanarchists have gained control of the social media forums and attempted to exert their will upon what should essentially be a Set In Stone Protocol to create something that facilitates their economic activity (such as selling explosives online)) while attempting to leverage their position as moderators who control the social forum to spin their actions as something different (note memorydealers is Roger Ver). For all his tears for the children killed in wars, it seems that what cryptoanarchists such as u/memorydealers want is to delist/shut down governments and they will go to any efforts such as censorship to make sure that it is their implementation of bitcoin that will do that. Are we really going to have a better world with people easier able to hide transactions/launder money?
Because of this power vacuum there also exists a number of different development groups but what is emerging now is that they are struggling for money to fund their development. The main engineering is done by self professed benevolent dictator Amaury Sechet (deadalnix) who in leaked telegram screen caps appears to be losing it as funding for development has dried up and money raised in an anarchist fashion wasn't compliant with laws around fundraising sources and FVNI (development society that manages BCH development and these donations) is run by known scammer David R Allen. David was founder of 2014 Israeli ICO Getgems (GEMZ) that scammed investors out of more than 2500 Bitcoins. The SV supported sky-lark who released this information has since deleted all their accounts but other users have claimed that sky-lark was sent personal details about themselves and pictures of their loved ones and subsequently deleted all their social media accounts afterwards.
There are other shifty behaviours like hiring Japanese influencers to shill their coin, recruiting a Hayden Otto that up until 2018 was shilling Pascal Coin to become a major ambassador for BCH in the Australian city of Townsville. Townsville was claimed to be BCH city hosting a BCH conference there and claiming loads of adoption, but at the conference itself their idea of demonstrating adoption was handing a Point of Sale device to the bar to accept bitcoin payments but Otto actually just putting his credit card behind the bar to settle and he would keep the BCH that everyone paid. In the lead up to the conference the second top moderator of btc was added to the moderators of townsville to shill their coin but has ended up with the townsville subreddit wanting to ban all bitcoin talk from the subreddit.
Many of the BCH developers are now infighting as funding dries up and they find themselves floundering with no vision of how to achieve scale or get actual real world adoption. Amaury has recently accused Peter Rizun of propagandising, told multiple users in the telegram to fuck off and from all accounts appears to be a malignant narcissist incapable of maintaining any kind of healthy relationship with people he is supposed to be working with. Peter Rizun has begun lurking in bitcoincashSV and recognising some of the ideas coming from BSV as having merit while Roger has started to distance himself from the creation of BCH. Interestingly at a point early in the BCH history Roger believed Dr Craig Wright was Satoshi, but once CSW wouldn't go along with their planned road map and revealed the fact he had patents on blockchain technology and wanted to go down a path that worked with Law, Roger retracted that statement and said he was tricked by Craig. He joined in on the faketoshi campaign and has been attempted to be sued by Dr Wright for libel in the UK to which Roger refused to engage citing grounds of jurisdiction. Ironically this avoidance of Roger to meet Dr Wright in court to defend his claims can be seen as the very argument against justice being served by private courts under an anarchocapitalist paradigm with essentially someone with resources simply being able to either flee a private court's jurisdiction or engage a team of lawyers that can bury any chances of an everyday person being able to get justice.
There is much more going on with the BCH drama that can be explained in a single post but it is clear that some of the major personalities in the project are very much interested in having their ideals projected on to the technical implementation of the bitcoin protocol and have no qualms spouting rhetoric around the anti-censorship qualities of bitcoin/BCH while at the same time employing significant censorship on their social media forums to control what people are exposed to and getting rid of anyone who challenges their vision. I posit that were this coin to become a success, these "benevolent dictators" as they put it would love their new found positions of wealth/dominance yet if their behaviour to get there is anything to go by, would demonstrate the same power tripping practices of censorship, weasel acts, misleading people about adoption statistics and curating of the narrative. When the hashrate from Rogers bitcoin.com minging operation on BCH dropped dramatically and a lot of empty blocks were being mined, his employer and 2IC moderator u/BitcoinXio (who stepped in to replace roger as CEO) was in the sub informing everyone it was simply variance that was the reason when only a few days later it was revealed that they had reduced their hash power significantly. This is not appropriate behaviour for one of the primary enterprises engaged in stewarding BCH and encouraging adoption nor is the inability to be accountable for such dishonest practices as well. It seems bitcoin.com treats btc as their own personal spam page where Roger can ask for donations despite it being against the sub rules and spin/ban any challenge to the narrative they seek to create.
Let's see how the censorship goes as I post this around a few of the same places as the last piece. Stay tuned for the next write up where I take a deep dive in to the coin that everyone doesn't want you to know about.
submitted by whipnil to C_S_T [link] [comments]

Introduction and overview of the Bitcoin system

In relation to this post:
https://www.reddit.com/btc/comments/eupegk/technical_review_of_the_past_10_years_and_how_the/
We put together an introductory overview of the Bitcoin System. As this is intended to help increase public understanding of BTC and thus increase it's adoption. What will you learn from the text:
If you do decide to go through the text would love some feedback. Was it clear? Did you get any value from it? Anything that needs to be expanded on? - we are really excited about this project and hope to make it to the best of our abilities.
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1 Introduction to the Bitcoin System

1.1 Introduction and General Description

There are many definitions and descriptions of Bitcoin. Some describe it as an innovative virtual or crypto currency, some as the system for peer-to–peer electronic cash payment transactions, and some others as decentralized platform and infrastructure for anonymous payment transactions using any type of crypto currency.
In this Report we will adopt the concept that the Bitcoin system is a payment system. It has its own features, its own currency, its own protocols and components, and with all that Bitcoin supports payment transactions. In other words, the core function of the Bitcoin system is to support payments between two parties – the party that makes a payment and the party that receives the payment.
Based on the original concept and the description of the Bitcoin [Bitcoin, 2016], “it is a decentralized digital currency that enables instant payments to anyone, anywhere in the world. Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority: transaction management and money issuance are carried out collectively by the network”.
The system is decentralized since its supporting platform blockchain, comprises an infrastructure of multiple distributed servers, mutually linked by an instantaneous broadcasting protocol. Users perform transactions within the open and distributed community of registered users. Digital currency used in the system is not electronic form of fiat currency, but a special form of the currency generated and used only within the Bitcoin system. This concept is based on the notion that money can be interpreted as any object, or any sort of record, that is accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts in a given country or socio-economic context. Bitcoin system is designed around the idea of using cryptography to control the creation and transfer of money, rather than relying on central authorities.
There are several important requirements when making any type of payment and with any currency. The best example of a “perfect” payment transaction that meets all these requirements is payment using cash over-the-counter. When a consumer pays to a merchant using cash over-the-counter, such transaction satisfies all requirements and expectations of both parties. First, the transaction is instantaneous, as the paper bill is transferred hand-to-hand, from the consumer to the merchant. The transaction is cheap, in fact there is no overhead charge to perform transaction, so the merchant receives the full amount. The transaction is irreversible, what is the property beneficial to merchants. The transaction is legal, as the merchant can verify the legality of the paper bill. And, finally, the transaction is anonymous for the consumer as he/she does not need to reveal his/her identity.
The only “problem” with cash over-the-counter is the cash itself, as using and handling cash has many disadvantages.
Bitcoin concept and system solves all issues and problems with the use of cash, but at the same time provides all advantages when performing transactions using digital and communication technologies. So, paying with Bitcoins is effectively payment transaction that uses “digital cash over-the-counter”. The concept of the Bitcoin system provides all advantages and benefits mentioned above with payments using cash over-the-counter, but eliminates the problems of using cash. That is the reason why Bitcoins are often referred to as “digital cash”.
One of significant features of payments using cash over-the-counter is that there are no third parties to participate or assist in the execution and validation of a transaction. This feature makes Bitcoin transactions very efficient and also very cheap to perform. Other types of todays payment systems, for instance using bank-to-bank account transfers or using bankcards, use many additional intermediate parties and use very complicated background infrastructure to validate and clear payment transactions. These infrastructures are complex to establish and operate, they are expensive, and they are vulnerable to attacks and penetrations by hackers. Bitcoin does not use such complex infrastructures, what is the reason that its transactions are efficient and cheap. An additional problem with third-party transaction players is that transaction parties must put the complete trust in all these parties without any means to verify their functionality, correctness, or security.
Bitcoin system uses public-key cryptography to protect the currency and transactions. Logical relationships between transaction parties is direct, peer-to-peer, and the process of validating transactions is based on cryptographic proof-of-work. When performing a transaction, the net effect is that certain amount of Bitcoins is transferred from one cryptographic address to another. Each user may have and use several addresses simultaneously. Each payment transaction is broadcast to the network of distributed transaction processing servers. These servers collect individual transactions, package them into blocks, and send them for validation.
Each block is cryptographically processed by the large number of so called “miners”. They each attempt to create cryptographic hash value that has special form. This is computationally very difficult and time-consuming task, therefore, it is very difficult to perform and repeat. Individual blocks are validated using cryptographic processing procedures that require substantial amount of work and computing power.
Approximately an hour or two after submitting the transaction for validation, each transaction is locked in time and by cryptographic processing by the massive amount of computing power that was used to complete the block. When the block is validated, it is added to the chain of all previous blocks, thus forming a public archive of all blocks and transactions in the system.
One of the most important problems with uncontrolled digital currency, where there are no third parties to validate and approve transactions, is so called double spending. Since the currency is digital, stored at user’s local workstations, in mobile phones, or on network servers, it can be easily copied and sent to multiple recipients multiple times.
Bitcoin system solves this problem with a very interesting approach. It is the first effective example of the solution for the double-spending problem without the need for assistance of any third party. Bitcoin solves this problem by keeping and distributing an archive of all transactions among all the users of the system via a peer-to-peer distribution network. Every transaction that occurs in the Bitcoin system is recorded in that public and distributed transactions ledger. Since the components in that ledger are blocks with transactions and the blocks are “chained” in time and in a cryptographic sequence, the ledger in the Bitcoin system is called blockchain.
That full blockchain of all transactions that were performed in the Bitcoin system before the specific transaction can be used to verify new transactions. The transactions are verified against the blockchain to ensure that the same Bitcoins have not been previously spent. This approach eliminates the double-spending problem. The essence of the verification procedure for a single transaction in fact is the test of the balance of the sending account. The test is very normal and natural: payment of a certain amount of the currency can be made only of the balance of the outgoing account is equal or larger than the payment amount. Current balance of an account is established by tracing all incoming and outgoing transactions for that account.
The procedure to verify the validity of individual transactions and to prevent double-spending is based on the use of special type of cryptographic protocol called public-key cryptography. With this type of cryptographic systems each user has two cryptographic keys. They are mutually related in the sense that, what ever the one key encrypts, the other key can decrypt. One of the two keys is a private key that is kept secret, and the other key is public key that can be shared with all other users in the system. When a user wants to make a payment to another user, the sender transfers certain amount of Bitcoins from his/her account to the account of the receiver. This action is performed by the sender by creating a payment message, called a “transaction,” which contains recipient’s public key – receiving address and payment amount. The transaction is cryptographically processed by the sender’s private key, the operation called digital signing, and as the result digital signature is created and appended to the transaction.
By using sender’s private key every user in the system can verify that the transaction was indeed created by the indicated sender, as his/her private key can successfully decrypt the content of the digital signature. The exchange is authentic, since the transaction was also cryptographically processed with the recipient’s public key, the operation which is called digital enveloping. This transformation guarantees that the transaction can be accepted and processed only by the holder of the corresponding private key, which is the intended recipient.
Every transaction, and thus the transfer of ownership of the specified amount of Bitcoins, is inserted, then time-stamped, and finally displayed in one “block” of the blockchain. Public-key cryptography ensures that all computers in the network have a constantly updated and verified record of all transactions within the Bitcoin network, which prevents double-spending and fraud.

1.2 The Concept and Features of the Bitcoin System

There are many concepts and even more operational payment systems today in the world. Some are standard paper–based, some are digital and network based. What makes Bitcoin unique and distinctive, compared with all other payment systems that are in use today, are several of its core features.
The first of them is that the system uses its own currency. The reason for using its own currency is to make the system independent of financial institutions as trusted third parties. The unit of the currency is called Bitcoin. The currency is so called crypto currency, because it is generated and used based on execution of certain cryptographic algorithms and protocols. Performing specific cryptographic protocols is in the heart of operations to create new Bitcoins, to transfer them between transaction parties, and to validate the correctness of transactions.
Since appearance of Bitcoins, several new systems were introduced that use cryptography to manage its own currency, so all such currencies represent the category of crypto currencies. Later in this Report, some other digital / virtual currencies will be described that are created and managed using some other principles, so they are not called crypto currency. At the time of writing this Report, all such digital virtual currencies were called with general term tokens, sometimes also digital assets tokens. The reason is that they were created by the process called collateralization and therefore they are related to the value of some categories of real world assets which is expressed in digital tokens units.
The second interesting and important feature of the Bitcoin system is that the logical relationship between the two transaction parties is direct, peer-to–peer, i.e. there are no other parties that participate in the transaction. This is an important feature and benefit / advantage of the system that contributes to its efficiency when compared with the todays complex and expensive financial payment infrastructures and protocols. However, for distribution of transactions to their validators and later to all other members in the Bitcoin system the physical flow of each transaction is very complex and includes many parties.
It should be emphasized that performing transactions as direct, peer-to–peer transfers is one of the key features and the most significant reason for many benefits and advantages of the Bitcoin system. This approach is the key feature of the Bitcoin system as it enables security and anonymity of parties, efficiency in performing transactions, scaling of the system, and instantaneous settlement of payments. Therefore, supporting execution and validation of serious business peer–to–peer transactions is one of the core benefits of the blockchain concept, as it changes the current paradigm of Internet applications and transactions. Currently all Internet applications are organized and performed as client–server transactions. Such transactions are not efficient, do not provide sufficient privacy of participants, have dependencies on third parties and usually are vulnerable due to attacks of functional problems with large centralized application servers.
The next very important characteristic of the Bitcoin system is anonymity of users, their accounts, and transactions. This property means that the identities of the participants in the system are not known even to the partners performing a payment transaction. All other system operations – receiving payments, making payments, validating transactions, etc. are also performed anonymously. Interpreting this property correctly, the anonymity of transaction participants is so called pseudo-anonymity. Namely, in the process of validating transactions, all previous transactions of the sender are traced back to the original initial transaction. If that initial transaction was the purchase of Bitcoins at some Bitcoin Exchange, then the identity of the original owner of Bitcoins is known. Most if not all service providers in the Bitcoin system today require very strict identification of participants for the purpose of enforcing legal and regulated transactions and include certain restrictions of transaction frequency and amounts. This procedure, although understandable from the legal and regulatory point of view, has in fact in essence changed one of the core principles of the original concept of the Bitcoin system – full anonymity of users.
Better solution for fully anonymous payment transactions is so called zero–knowledge protocol, where the identity and authorization to perform Bitcoin transactions, is validated by anyone without revealing any identity information of the parties. The only problem with this approach is revealing the identity of transaction participants to law enforcement authorities in case of illegal transactions. But, such authorities have special authorization under the law and they should be enabled to get identifying information about transaction participants in the process of legal law enforcement procedures. But, all other service providers do not have such status, so if Bitcoin principles are strictly followed, they should not be able to have identifying information about system participants.
This approach and potential improvement of the Bitcoin system implies that the system needs one of the classical security services: role–based authorization. In such arrangement, there would be at least two categories of system participants: those that are authorized to maintain and access identifying information about the participants and those that are only authorized to perform transactions. In the first category are legal authorities, like police, driving license authorities, tax authorities, etc. In the context of the standard Identities Management Systems, such participants are called Identity Providers. All others are Identity Verifiers. Therefore, one of the main conclusions about true anonymity in the Bitcoin system is establishment of a sophisticated and multi-role Identities Management System, where some parties will be authorized Identity Providers and all others will be Identity Validators. Finally, referring back to the infrastructure of the Bitcoin system to perform and validate transactions – blockchain, the conclusion is that what is needed, as one of the most important extensions of the current concept of anonymity of Bitcoins participants, is an Identity Management System based itself on the use of blockchain and without Identity Providers as trusted third parties. Creation, distribution, use and validation of identities are transactions in the system, equivalent to payment transactions, so they should also be performed using blockchain protocol. Such system, that can provide reliable identities of all participants may be called Blockchain Identity Management System.
Another very important feature of the original concept of the Bitcoin system is that it is not controlled by any financial institution, by any regulatory body or by any legal financial authority when it comes to issuing Bitcoins and determining their value. This means that the currency used in the system and all transactions are exempted from any legal and financial rules and regulations. The rules controlling Bitcoin system are built in its code. This property is usually called “rule by the technical code”, as the rules of system operations, built in the code of its operational components, control and rule the operations of the system [UK, 2016], Chapter 3. This property is sometimes described as “control by the community”, i.e. the participating users.
This property implies that the value of Bitcoins is determined solely on the market – based on its supply and demand. This is quite natural approach, as the value of shares of companies are also determined on an open trading market. However, such approach implies that the value of Bitcoin, as crypto currency, is volatile related to fiat currencies. This property represent serious problem to perform payments using Bitcoin. It is well-known that volatile currencies are not suitable for payments. The practice of all the years while Bitcoins are in use has shown that its volatility represents one of the major obstacles for its main purpose – to be used as the payment system. In fact, it was announced that in 2019 the total value of Bitcoin transactions performed was about $ 11 T. However, unfortunately, only about 1.3% of those transactions were payments, all others were trading manipulations on exchanges. Based on that, it may be clearly stated that Bitcoin today is not used as the payment system, but as currency manipulation system. This is one of the main problems with the concept and current implementation and deployment of Bitcoin system and in near future may represent the main reason for its decline in popularity.

1.3 Innovative Contributions of the Bitcoin System

Besides an effective procedure to transfer an amount of crypto currency from one user (account) to another user (account), the major and indeed an essential contribution of the concept of the Bitcoin is the solution to the general problem how to establish trust between two mutually unknown and otherwise unrelated parties to such an extent and certainty that sensitive and secure transactions can be performed with full confidence over an open environment, such as Internet. In all current large scale and not only financial systems that problem is solved by using the assistance of third parties. For many (may be even all) current Internet applications and transactions those third parties are integrated and linked into a large, complex, expensive and vulnerable operational infrastructures. Examples of such infrastructures today are bankcard networks supporting global international payments, global international banking networks supporting international financial transfers, Public–Key Infrastructures (PKI), Identity Management Systems, and many others. It is a general consent that such infrastructures are expensive and, more important, vulnerable to external and internal attacks.
In addition to the complexity and vulnerabilities of such current operational supporting infrastructures, another requirement and prerequisite to use their services is that users must put the complete trust in these third parties. Accepting to trust those third–party service providers is the necessary and mandatory prerequisite to use their services.
Therefore, one of the most important contributions of the concept of Bitcoin is that it solves the issue how two parties, mutually unknown to each other in advance and otherwise completely unrelated, can perform sensitive and secure transactions, such as transfer of money – payments, but without assistance of any third party and without the need to place trust in any component of the system.
The practical benefits of solving this problem and the most important consequence of the solution for this problem – Bitcoin system, is that it provides the possibility for one Internet user to transfer not only Bitcoins, but also any other form of digital asset to or shared with another Internet user, such that the transfer is guaranteed to be safe and secure, that everyone knows that the transfer has been performed, and nobody can challenge the legitimacy of the transfer.
This feature of the Bitcoin system generated many very new, creative and innovative ideas where the concept equivalent to the Bitcoin can be used to perform secure and reliable transactions between users in an open community handling any type of digital asset ([Andreesen, 2014], [Sparkes, 2014], [UniCredit, 2016], [BitID, 2015], [PoE, 2015]). The examples of such applications and transactions range from commercial transitions, real estate transactions, energy trading, electronic voting, medical applications, and many others ([Kounelis, 2015], [Muftic, 2016]). The concept of blockchain as technology supporting validation of all such transactions is therefore called disruptive technology.
As the conclusion in this section, we may give a definition of blockchain:
Blockchain is an innovative concept, implemented as an infrastructure comprising multiple and distributed servers, mutually linked by special broadcasting and synchronization protocols, managing immutable objects with the purpose to enable and protect secure peer–to–peer transactions in a global and open environment.

1.4 Summary of Problems and Potential Solutions

In section 1.2 several problems of the Bitcoin system were mentioned and potential solutions for these problems were outlined. Recently, at the time of writing this Technical Report, several sources, mainly personal blogs and articles, appeared with very interesting opinions and statements regarding some other serious Bitcoin problems. Some of them are problems with the concept of the system, some problems of its design, and some problems of operations. In this section some of these problems are briefly summarized including suggestions for their potential solutions. The source of some problems was the article [Ein, 2018].
Problem 1: Complex Crypto Algorithms
Problem: Bitcoins is crypto currency and cryptographic algorithms used in the current version are very complex, based on the concept of proof–of–work, and require long time, special hardware and a lots of energy to perform
Potential Solution: Potential solution fro this problem is to use cryptographic algorithms that are simpler and therefore more efficient to execute and need less energy
Problems with Potential Solution: Lowering the complexity of crypto algorithms introduces vulnerability to hackers. Therefore, what is needed are strong algorithms and simple to perform for regular users and complex to break by hackers
Problem 2: Indirect Transactions, not Peer–to–Peer
Problem: Contrary to the concept claimed, in todays implementation Bitcoin payment transactions are not performed as direct, peer–to–peer transactions. They are performed indirectly, submitted to the Bitcoin network, and recipients receive them indirectly, by downloading validated transactions from the ledger
Potential Solution: Transactions should be performed directly, by transferring them directly between two users
Problems with Potential Solution: The problem with the potential solution is validation of transaction for proof of possession of Bitcoins by the sender and for prevention of double-spending. Therefore, what is needed is the protocol to validate peer–to–peer transactions.
Problem 3: Anonymity of Users not provided
Problem: Contrary to the concept claimed, in todays deployments of additional system components, mainly exchanges, users are not anonymous
Potential Solution: Blockchain–based Distributed Identity Management System with Role-based Authorizations
Problems with Potential Solution: The problem with potential solution is that it depends on trusted third parties with authorized roles. Therefore, what is needed is blockchain-based Identity Management System using hybrid (permissioned and unpermissioned) blockchain
Problem 4: Volatile Value, not suitable for Payments
Problem: Contrary to the concept claimed that Bitcoin is payment system, volatile value of the currency makes it inconvenient for payments
Potential Solution: Crypto currency with stable value
Problems with Potential Solution: The problem with the potential solution is that the value of Bitcoins is determined on the secondary market, during its trading (cash-in / cash-out). Therefore, what is needed is crypto currency that does not have volatile value
The remaining problems in this section are quoted from [Ein, 2018]:
Problem 5: Negative Environmental Impact
Problem: Mining algorithms and operational facilities (“mining farms”) consume too much electrical energy, based on the “proof-of-work” protocol
Potential Solution: Using mining algorithms that consume less energy, either as simpler / lighter crypto algorithms or using alternative crypto protocols to protect transactions integrity (“proof-of-stake”)
Problems with Potential Solution: The problem with the potential solution is that simpler / lighter algorithms open vulnerabilities to hackers while alternative crypto protocols are not backward compatible with the current system
Problem 6: Slow Performance (Delays) / Low Throughput
Problem: Due to blocking and the designed time for protection of transactions (10 minutes) Bitcoin system has very slow performance – transactions are validated in about an hour and transaction processing throughput is about 7 transactions per second
Potential Solution: Using transaction validation algorithms and protocols that do not need blocking of transactions, but transactions should be validated individually
Problems with Potential Solution: There are no serious problems with the proposed potential solution
Problem 7: Limited Number of Bitcoins
Problem: Due hardware and other types of failures, the number of available Bitcoins in the system is constantly reducing
Potential Solution: Potential solution could be to use smaller portions of Bitcoin (“Satoshi”) or introduce hard-fork by splitting the amount of available Bitcoins
Problems with Potential Solution: The problems with the first solution that it is not user-friendly and the problem with the second solution is backwards compatibility.
Problem 8: Real Value of Bitcoins
Problem: The value of Bitcoins is purely psychological and reflects only pure market speculations
Potential Solution: Potential solution could be to peg the value of Bitcoin to local fiat currencies in countries of deployments
Problems with Potential Solution: The problems with the potential solution is that such Bitcoins would be a new class of Bitcoins, not traded on exchanges and not volatile
At the end of this section, it is very interesting to quote two opinions about the future of Bitcoin and blockchain:
[Ein, 2018]: “It seems that Bitcoin will likely cease to have meaningful value*, defeating the whole point and philosophy imagined by Satoshi Nakamoto, the alleged inventor of Bitcoin. Its current value appears to be purely psychological, and the hype seems to be driven by irrational exuberance, greed and speculation. Modern human history has seen many* bubbles*, including the dot-com bubble, the housing bubble and even the tulip bubble. However, when these bubbles exploded, many excellent dot-com companies survived, most houses regained their value and tulips still have meaning and carry value in our lives today. But what will happen when the Bitcoin bubble bursts? What* utility or residual value will Bitcoin have to consumers and businesses? Most likely none*. And this is the real problem with Bitcoin and crypto currencies.*
Bitcoin will likely go down in history as a great technological invention that popularized blockchain yet failed due to its design limitations*. Just like the industrial revolution was fueled by the combustion engine, Nakamoto’s most valuable contribution is the* blockchain polymorphic engine that will further accelerate innovation in the post-information age and immensely affect our lives”.
This quote makes two very important and far–reaching predictions:
(1) Bitcoin, as the payment system will disappear (“. . . will go down in history”), and
(2) The most valuable contribution of the Bitcoin system is blockchain
This article was written in 2018. It is very interesting to notice that at the time of writing this Technical Report, (1) Bitcoin was still “alive” and (2) the concept and deployments of blockchain were in serious trouble.
Based on the principle of positive and creative approach, in the rest of this Technical Report, besides description of all technical details of the Bitcoin system, some potential solutions for its improvement will also be discussed.
However, contrary to the predicted status of Bitcoin, it seems that the predicted status of blockchain, in 2020 was still facing serious problems.
[Barber, 2019]: What's Blockchain Actually Good for, Anyway? For Now, Not Much
“Not long ago, blockchain technology was touted as a way to track tuna, bypass banks, and preserve property records. Reality has proved a much tougher challenge”.

[Lucanus, 2020]: Has Blockchain Failed Before It Even Really Began?

“Just as everyone was getting really excited about its potential, it appears blockchain is dead. For a technology that was supposed to transform and solve seemingly every problem in the world, the enthusiasm is fading pretty quickly”.
At the time of writing this Technical Report, there were many new blockchain – concepts, design and even several deployed and operational instances. Some of them are even very popular, but only among enthusiastic developers. The overall trends with real life deployments, and more and more comments about the capabilities and features of blockchains are appearing with negative connotation. Therefore, seems that even for blockchain some innovative concepts and approaches are needed. They are beyond the scope of this Technical Report and will be addressed in some of our follow-up reports.
submitted by Theus5 to btc [link] [comments]

Introduction and overview of the Bitcoin system

Based on this post I made a bit earlier:
https://www.reddit.com/BitcoinBeginners/comments/euozq4/blockchain_and_btc_technical_review_of_the_past/
We put together an introductory overview of the Bitcoin System. As this is intended for beginners I think this subreddit would be a good place to get some feedback. What will you learn from the text:
If you do decide to go through the text would love some feedback. Was it clear? Did you get any value from it? Anything that needs to be expanded on?
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1 Introduction to the Bitcoin System

1.1 Introduction and General Description

There are many definitions and descriptions of Bitcoin. Some describe it as an innovative virtual or crypto currency, some as the system for peer-to–peer electronic cash payment transactions, and some others as decentralized platform and infrastructure for anonymous payment transactions using any type of crypto currency.
In this Report we will adopt the concept that the Bitcoin system is a payment system. It has its own features, its own currency, its own protocols and components, and with all that Bitcoin supports payment transactions. In other words, the core function of the Bitcoin system is to support payments between two parties – the party that makes a payment and the party that receives the payment.
Based on the original concept and the description of the Bitcoin [Bitcoin, 2016], “it is a decentralized digital currency that enables instant payments to anyone, anywhere in the world. Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority: transaction management and money issuance are carried out collectively by the network”.
The system is decentralized since its supporting platform blockchain, comprises an infrastructure of multiple distributed servers, mutually linked by an instantaneous broadcasting protocol. Users perform transactions within the open and distributed community of registered users. Digital currency used in the system is not electronic form of fiat currency, but a special form of the currency generated and used only within the Bitcoin system. This concept is based on the notion that money can be interpreted as any object, or any sort of record, that is accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts in a given country or socio-economic context. Bitcoin system is designed around the idea of using cryptography to control the creation and transfer of money, rather than relying on central authorities.
There are several important requirements when making any type of payment and with any currency. The best example of a “perfect” payment transaction that meets all these requirements is payment using cash over-the-counter. When a consumer pays to a merchant using cash over-the-counter, such transaction satisfies all requirements and expectations of both parties. First, the transaction is instantaneous, as the paper bill is transferred hand-to-hand, from the consumer to the merchant. The transaction is cheap, in fact there is no overhead charge to perform transaction, so the merchant receives the full amount. The transaction is irreversible, what is the property beneficial to merchants. The transaction is legal, as the merchant can verify the legality of the paper bill. And, finally, the transaction is anonymous for the consumer as he/she does not need to reveal his/her identity.
The only “problem” with cash over-the-counter is the cash itself, as using and handling cash has many disadvantages.
Bitcoin concept and system solves all issues and problems with the use of cash, but at the same time provides all advantages when performing transactions using digital and communication technologies. So, paying with Bitcoins is effectively payment transaction that uses “digital cash over-the-counter”. The concept of the Bitcoin system provides all advantages and benefits mentioned above with payments using cash over-the-counter, but eliminates the problems of using cash. That is the reason why Bitcoins are often referred to as “digital cash”.
One of significant features of payments using cash over-the-counter is that there are no third parties to participate or assist in the execution and validation of a transaction. This feature makes Bitcoin transactions very efficient and also very cheap to perform. Other types of todays payment systems, for instance using bank-to-bank account transfers or using bankcards, use many additional intermediate parties and use very complicated background infrastructure to validate and clear payment transactions. These infrastructures are complex to establish and operate, they are expensive, and they are vulnerable to attacks and penetrations by hackers. Bitcoin does not use such complex infrastructures, what is the reason that its transactions are efficient and cheap. An additional problem with third-party transaction players is that transaction parties must put the complete trust in all these parties without any means to verify their functionality, correctness, or security.
Bitcoin system uses public-key cryptography to protect the currency and transactions. Logical relationships between transaction parties is direct, peer-to-peer, and the process of validating transactions is based on cryptographic proof-of-work. When performing a transaction, the net effect is that certain amount of Bitcoins is transferred from one cryptographic address to another. Each user may have and use several addresses simultaneously. Each payment transaction is broadcast to the network of distributed transaction processing servers. These servers collect individual transactions, package them into blocks, and send them for validation.
Each block is cryptographically processed by the large number of so called “miners”. They each attempt to create cryptographic hash value that has special form. This is computationally very difficult and time-consuming task, therefore, it is very difficult to perform and repeat. Individual blocks are validated using cryptographic processing procedures that require substantial amount of work and computing power.
Approximately an hour or two after submitting the transaction for validation, each transaction is locked in time and by cryptographic processing by the massive amount of computing power that was used to complete the block. When the block is validated, it is added to the chain of all previous blocks, thus forming a public archive of all blocks and transactions in the system.
One of the most important problems with uncontrolled digital currency, where there are no third parties to validate and approve transactions, is so called double spending. Since the currency is digital, stored at user’s local workstations, in mobile phones, or on network servers, it can be easily copied and sent to multiple recipients multiple times.
Bitcoin system solves this problem with a very interesting approach. It is the first effective example of the solution for the double-spending problem without the need for assistance of any third party. Bitcoin solves this problem by keeping and distributing an archive of all transactions among all the users of the system via a peer-to-peer distribution network. Every transaction that occurs in the Bitcoin system is recorded in that public and distributed transactions ledger. Since the components in that ledger are blocks with transactions and the blocks are “chained” in time and in a cryptographic sequence, the ledger in the Bitcoin system is called blockchain.
That full blockchain of all transactions that were performed in the Bitcoin system before the specific transaction can be used to verify new transactions. The transactions are verified against the blockchain to ensure that the same Bitcoins have not been previously spent. This approach eliminates the double-spending problem. The essence of the verification procedure for a single transaction in fact is the test of the balance of the sending account. The test is very normal and natural: payment of a certain amount of the currency can be made only of the balance of the outgoing account is equal or larger than the payment amount. Current balance of an account is established by tracing all incoming and outgoing transactions for that account.
The procedure to verify the validity of individual transactions and to prevent double-spending is based on the use of special type of cryptographic protocol called public-key cryptography. With this type of cryptographic systems each user has two cryptographic keys. They are mutually related in the sense that, what ever the one key encrypts, the other key can decrypt. One of the two keys is a private key that is kept secret, and the other key is public key that can be shared with all other users in the system. When a user wants to make a payment to another user, the sender transfers certain amount of Bitcoins from his/her account to the account of the receiver. This action is performed by the sender by creating a payment message, called a “transaction,” which contains recipient’s public key – receiving address and payment amount. The transaction is cryptographically processed by the sender’s private key, the operation called digital signing, and as the result digital signature is created and appended to the transaction.
By using sender’s private key every user in the system can verify that the transaction was indeed created by the indicated sender, as his/her private key can successfully decrypt the content of the digital signature. The exchange is authentic, since the transaction was also cryptographically processed with the recipient’s public key, the operation which is called digital enveloping. This transformation guarantees that the transaction can be accepted and processed only by the holder of the corresponding private key, which is the intended recipient.
Every transaction, and thus the transfer of ownership of the specified amount of Bitcoins, is inserted, then time-stamped, and finally displayed in one “block” of the blockchain. Public-key cryptography ensures that all computers in the network have a constantly updated and verified record of all transactions within the Bitcoin network, which prevents double-spending and fraud.

1.2 The Concept and Features of the Bitcoin System

There are many concepts and even more operational payment systems today in the world. Some are standard paper–based, some are digital and network based. What makes Bitcoin unique and distinctive, compared with all other payment systems that are in use today, are several of its core features.
The first of them is that the system uses its own currency. The reason for using its own currency is to make the system independent of financial institutions as trusted third parties. The unit of the currency is called Bitcoin. The currency is so called crypto currency, because it is generated and used based on execution of certain cryptographic algorithms and protocols. Performing specific cryptographic protocols is in the heart of operations to create new Bitcoins, to transfer them between transaction parties, and to validate the correctness of transactions.
Since appearance of Bitcoins, several new systems were introduced that use cryptography to manage its own currency, so all such currencies represent the category of crypto currencies. Later in this Report, some other digital / virtual currencies will be described that are created and managed using some other principles, so they are not called crypto currency. At the time of writing this Report, all such digital virtual currencies were called with general term tokens, sometimes also digital assets tokens. The reason is that they were created by the process called collateralization and therefore they are related to the value of some categories of real world assets which is expressed in digital tokens units.
The second interesting and important feature of the Bitcoin system is that the logical relationship between the two transaction parties is direct, peer-to–peer, i.e. there are no other parties that participate in the transaction. This is an important feature and benefit / advantage of the system that contributes to its efficiency when compared with the todays complex and expensive financial payment infrastructures and protocols. However, for distribution of transactions to their validators and later to all other members in the Bitcoin system the physical flow of each transaction is very complex and includes many parties.
It should be emphasized that performing transactions as direct, peer-to–peer transfers is one of the key features and the most significant reason for many benefits and advantages of the Bitcoin system. This approach is the key feature of the Bitcoin system as it enables security and anonymity of parties, efficiency in performing transactions, scaling of the system, and instantaneous settlement of payments. Therefore, supporting execution and validation of serious business peer–to–peer transactions is one of the core benefits of the blockchain concept, as it changes the current paradigm of Internet applications and transactions. Currently all Internet applications are organized and performed as client–server transactions. Such transactions are not efficient, do not provide sufficient privacy of participants, have dependencies on third parties and usually are vulnerable due to attacks of functional problems with large centralized application servers.
The next very important characteristic of the Bitcoin system is anonymity of users, their accounts, and transactions. This property means that the identities of the participants in the system are not known even to the partners performing a payment transaction. All other system operations – receiving payments, making payments, validating transactions, etc. are also performed anonymously. Interpreting this property correctly, the anonymity of transaction participants is so called pseudo-anonymity. Namely, in the process of validating transactions, all previous transactions of the sender are traced back to the original initial transaction. If that initial transaction was the purchase of Bitcoins at some Bitcoin Exchange, then the identity of the original owner of Bitcoins is known. Most if not all service providers in the Bitcoin system today require very strict identification of participants for the purpose of enforcing legal and regulated transactions and include certain restrictions of transaction frequency and amounts. This procedure, although understandable from the legal and regulatory point of view, has in fact in essence changed one of the core principles of the original concept of the Bitcoin system – full anonymity of users.
Better solution for fully anonymous payment transactions is so called zero–knowledge protocol, where the identity and authorization to perform Bitcoin transactions, is validated by anyone without revealing any identity information of the parties. The only problem with this approach is revealing the identity of transaction participants to law enforcement authorities in case of illegal transactions. But, such authorities have special authorization under the law and they should be enabled to get identifying information about transaction participants in the process of legal law enforcement procedures. But, all other service providers do not have such status, so if Bitcoin principles are strictly followed, they should not be able to have identifying information about system participants.
This approach and potential improvement of the Bitcoin system implies that the system needs one of the classical security services: role–based authorization. In such arrangement, there would be at least two categories of system participants: those that are authorized to maintain and access identifying information about the participants and those that are only authorized to perform transactions. In the first category are legal authorities, like police, driving license authorities, tax authorities, etc. In the context of the standard Identities Management Systems, such participants are called Identity Providers. All others are Identity Verifiers. Therefore, one of the main conclusions about true anonymity in the Bitcoin system is establishment of a sophisticated and multi-role Identities Management System, where some parties will be authorized Identity Providers and all others will be Identity Validators. Finally, referring back to the infrastructure of the Bitcoin system to perform and validate transactions – blockchain, the conclusion is that what is needed, as one of the most important extensions of the current concept of anonymity of Bitcoins participants, is an Identity Management System based itself on the use of blockchain and without Identity Providers as trusted third parties. Creation, distribution, use and validation of identities are transactions in the system, equivalent to payment transactions, so they should also be performed using blockchain protocol. Such system, that can provide reliable identities of all participants may be called Blockchain Identity Management System.
Another very important feature of the original concept of the Bitcoin system is that it is not controlled by any financial institution, by any regulatory body or by any legal financial authority when it comes to issuing Bitcoins and determining their value. This means that the currency used in the system and all transactions are exempted from any legal and financial rules and regulations. The rules controlling Bitcoin system are built in its code. This property is usually called “rule by the technical code”, as the rules of system operations, built in the code of its operational components, control and rule the operations of the system [UK, 2016], Chapter 3. This property is sometimes described as “control by the community”, i.e. the participating users.
This property implies that the value of Bitcoins is determined solely on the market – based on its supply and demand. This is quite natural approach, as the value of shares of companies are also determined on an open trading market. However, such approach implies that the value of Bitcoin, as crypto currency, is volatile related to fiat currencies. This property represent serious problem to perform payments using Bitcoin. It is well-known that volatile currencies are not suitable for payments. The practice of all the years while Bitcoins are in use has shown that its volatility represents one of the major obstacles for its main purpose – to be used as the payment system. In fact, it was announced that in 2019 the total value of Bitcoin transactions performed was about $ 11 T. However, unfortunately, only about 1.3% of those transactions were payments, all others were trading manipulations on exchanges. Based on that, it may be clearly stated that Bitcoin today is not used as the payment system, but as currency manipulation system. This is one of the main problems with the concept and current implementation and deployment of Bitcoin system and in near future may represent the main reason for its decline in popularity.

1.3 Innovative Contributions of the Bitcoin System

Besides an effective procedure to transfer an amount of crypto currency from one user (account) to another user (account), the major and indeed an essential contribution of the concept of the Bitcoin is the solution to the general problem how to establish trust between two mutually unknown and otherwise unrelated parties to such an extent and certainty that sensitive and secure transactions can be performed with full confidence over an open environment, such as Internet. In all current large scale and not only financial systems that problem is solved by using the assistance of third parties. For many (may be even all) current Internet applications and transactions those third parties are integrated and linked into a large, complex, expensive and vulnerable operational infrastructures. Examples of such infrastructures today are bankcard networks supporting global international payments, global international banking networks supporting international financial transfers, Public–Key Infrastructures (PKI), Identity Management Systems, and many others. It is a general consent that such infrastructures are expensive and, more important, vulnerable to external and internal attacks.
In addition to the complexity and vulnerabilities of such current operational supporting infrastructures, another requirement and prerequisite to use their services is that users must put the complete trust in these third parties. Accepting to trust those third–party service providers is the necessary and mandatory prerequisite to use their services.
Therefore, one of the most important contributions of the concept of Bitcoin is that it solves the issue how two parties, mutually unknown to each other in advance and otherwise completely unrelated, can perform sensitive and secure transactions, such as transfer of money – payments, but without assistance of any third party and without the need to place trust in any component of the system.
The practical benefits of solving this problem and the most important consequence of the solution for this problem – Bitcoin system, is that it provides the possibility for one Internet user to transfer not only Bitcoins, but also any other form of digital asset to or shared with another Internet user, such that the transfer is guaranteed to be safe and secure, that everyone knows that the transfer has been performed, and nobody can challenge the legitimacy of the transfer.
This feature of the Bitcoin system generated many very new, creative and innovative ideas where the concept equivalent to the Bitcoin can be used to perform secure and reliable transactions between users in an open community handling any type of digital asset ([Andreesen, 2014], [Sparkes, 2014], [UniCredit, 2016], [BitID, 2015], [PoE, 2015]). The examples of such applications and transactions range from commercial transitions, real estate transactions, energy trading, electronic voting, medical applications, and many others ([Kounelis, 2015], [Muftic, 2016]). The concept of blockchain as technology supporting validation of all such transactions is therefore called disruptive technology.
As the conclusion in this section, we may give a definition of blockchain:
Blockchain is an innovative concept, implemented as an infrastructure comprising multiple and distributed servers, mutually linked by special broadcasting and synchronization protocols, managing immutable objects with the purpose to enable and protect secure peer–to–peer transactions in a global and open environment.

1.4 Summary of Problems and Potential Solutions

In section 1.2 several problems of the Bitcoin system were mentioned and potential solutions for these problems were outlined. Recently, at the time of writing this Technical Report, several sources, mainly personal blogs and articles, appeared with very interesting opinions and statements regarding some other serious Bitcoin problems. Some of them are problems with the concept of the system, some problems of its design, and some problems of operations. In this section some of these problems are briefly summarized including suggestions for their potential solutions. The source of some problems was the article [Ein, 2018].
Problem 1: Complex Crypto Algorithms
Problem: Bitcoins is crypto currency and cryptographic algorithms used in the current version are very complex, based on the concept of proof–of–work, and require long time, special hardware and a lots of energy to perform
Potential Solution: Potential solution fro this problem is to use cryptographic algorithms that are simpler and therefore more efficient to execute and need less energy
Problems with Potential Solution: Lowering the complexity of crypto algorithms introduces vulnerability to hackers. Therefore, what is needed are strong algorithms and simple to perform for regular users and complex to break by hackers
Problem 2: Indirect Transactions, not Peer–to–Peer
Problem: Contrary to the concept claimed, in todays implementation Bitcoin payment transactions are not performed as direct, peer–to–peer transactions. They are performed indirectly, submitted to the Bitcoin network, and recipients receive them indirectly, by downloading validated transactions from the ledger
Potential Solution: Transactions should be performed directly, by transferring them directly between two users
Problems with Potential Solution: The problem with the potential solution is validation of transaction for proof of possession of Bitcoins by the sender and for prevention of double-spending. Therefore, what is needed is the protocol to validate peer–to–peer transactions.
Problem 3: Anonymity of Users not provided
Problem: Contrary to the concept claimed, in todays deployments of additional system components, mainly exchanges, users are not anonymous
Potential Solution: Blockchain–based Distributed Identity Management System with Role-based Authorizations
Problems with Potential Solution: The problem with potential solution is that it depends on trusted third parties with authorized roles. Therefore, what is needed is blockchain-based Identity Management System using hybrid (permissioned and unpermissioned) blockchain
Problem 4: Volatile Value, not suitable for Payments
Problem: Contrary to the concept claimed that Bitcoin is payment system, volatile value of the currency makes it inconvenient for payments
Potential Solution: Crypto currency with stable value
Problems with Potential Solution: The problem with the potential solution is that the value of Bitcoins is determined on the secondary market, during its trading (cash-in / cash-out). Therefore, what is needed is crypto currency that does not have volatile value
The remaining problems in this section are quoted from [Ein, 2018]:
Problem 5: Negative Environmental Impact
Problem: Mining algorithms and operational facilities (“mining farms”) consume too much electrical energy, based on the “proof-of-work” protocol
Potential Solution: Using mining algorithms that consume less energy, either as simpler / lighter crypto algorithms or using alternative crypto protocols to protect transactions integrity (“proof-of-stake”)
Problems with Potential Solution: The problem with the potential solution is that simpler / lighter algorithms open vulnerabilities to hackers while alternative crypto protocols are not backward compatible with the current system
Problem 6: Slow Performance (Delays) / Low Throughput
Problem: Due to blocking and the designed time for protection of transactions (10 minutes) Bitcoin system has very slow performance – transactions are validated in about an hour and transaction processing throughput is about 7 transactions per second
Potential Solution: Using transaction validation algorithms and protocols that do not need blocking of transactions, but transactions should be validated individually
Problems with Potential Solution: There are no serious problems with the proposed potential solution
Problem 7: Limited Number of Bitcoins
Problem: Due hardware and other types of failures, the number of available Bitcoins in the system is constantly reducing
Potential Solution: Potential solution could be to use smaller portions of Bitcoin (“Satoshi”) or introduce hard-fork by splitting the amount of available Bitcoins
Problems with Potential Solution: The problems with the first solution that it is not user-friendly and the problem with the second solution is backwards compatibility.
Problem 8: Real Value of Bitcoins
Problem: The value of Bitcoins is purely psychological and reflects only pure market speculations
Potential Solution: Potential solution could be to peg the value of Bitcoin to local fiat currencies in countries of deployments
Problems with Potential Solution: The problems with the potential solution is that such Bitcoins would be a new class of Bitcoins, not traded on exchanges and not volatile
At the end of this section, it is very interesting to quote two opinions about the future of Bitcoin and blockchain:
[Ein, 2018]: “It seems that Bitcoin will likely cease to have meaningful value, defeating the whole point and philosophy imagined by Satoshi Nakamoto, the alleged inventor of Bitcoin. Its current value appears to be purely psychological, and the hype seems to be driven by irrational exuberance, greed and speculation. Modern human history has seen many bubbles, including the dot-com bubble, the housing bubble and even the tulip bubble. However, when these bubbles exploded, many excellent dot-com companies survived, most houses regained their value and tulips still have meaning and carry value in our lives today. But what will happen when the Bitcoin bubble bursts? What utility or residual value will Bitcoin have to consumers and businesses? Most likely none. And this is the real problem with Bitcoin and crypto currencies.
Bitcoin will likely go down in history as a great technological invention that popularized blockchain yet failed due to its design limitations. Just like the industrial revolution was fueled by the combustion engine, Nakamoto’s most valuable contribution is the blockchain polymorphic engine that will further accelerate innovation in the post-information age and immensely affect our lives”.
This quote makes two very important and far–reaching predictions:
(1) Bitcoin, as the payment system will disappear (“. . . will go down in history”), and
(2) The most valuable contribution of the Bitcoin system is blockchain
This article was written in 2018. It is very interesting to notice that at the time of writing this Technical Report, (1) Bitcoin was still “alive” and (2) the concept and deployments of blockchain were in serious trouble.
Based on the principle of positive and creative approach, in the rest of this Technical Report, besides description of all technical details of the Bitcoin system, some potential solutions for its improvement will also be discussed.
However, contrary to the predicted status of Bitcoin, it seems that the predicted status of blockchain, in 2020 was still facing serious problems.
[Barber, 2019]: What's Blockchain Actually Good for, Anyway? For Now, Not Much
“Not long ago, blockchain technology was touted as a way to track tuna, bypass banks, and preserve property records. Reality has proved a much tougher challenge”.

[Lucanus, 2020]: Has Blockchain Failed Before It Even Really Began?

“Just as everyone was getting really excited about its potential, it appears blockchain is dead. For a technology that was supposed to transform and solve seemingly every problem in the world, the enthusiasm is fading pretty quickly”.
At the time of writing this Technical Report, there were many new blockchain – concepts, design and even several deployed and operational instances. Some of them are even very popular, but only among enthusiastic developers. The overall trends with real life deployments, and more and more comments about the capabilities and features of blockchains are appearing with negative connotation. Therefore, seems that even for blockchain some innovative concepts and approaches are needed. They are beyond the scope of this Technical Report and will be addressed in some of our follow-up reports.
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As Bitcoin develops and becomes more popular we foresee that these Tax rules must change. Using Bitcoin in a shop or online could become as popular as buying items off the internet. As a result it would be impossible to have a capital gain event arising on every single one of these transactions. Mining cryptocurrency would be liable to income tax where coins are sold after having been mined. In this scenario the costs (sometimes significant) of the mining operation would be subtracted from the payment received for the coins. Many people may be caught under the scenarios described above and, with the tax deadline now three weeks away, time is running out to get tax compliant. Read also ... Therefore, the Bitcoin buyer is liable to capital gains tax on their gain. For example, let's say you bought two Bitcoin three years ago at a price of £230. As the current price of a Bitcoin is approximately £8,000, you would make a capital gain of roughly £15,500. Capital gains tax comes into affect after gains pass the 11,300 threshold, therefore this situation would leave 4,200 to be ... If the mining amounts to a trade for tax purposes the cryptoassets will initially form part of trading stock. If these cryptoassets are transferred out of trading stock, the business will be ... The tax returns for the 2018–2019 tax year are due at the end of January! This is a guest post by Robin Singh, founder of Koinly, a cryptocurrency tax startup. Views expressed are his own and do not necessarily reflect those of Bitcoin Magazine or BTC Inc. This article is for information purposes only and should not be construed as financial ... Bitcoin’s Legal Classification in the UK. The UK views Bitcoin through 2 different legal lenses, depending upon how frequently one transacts with it and for what purposes. We have no particular insight on how frequency is assessed or how purposes are decided. UK tax law is unfortunately vague on this issue. If you’re unsure which category ...

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